Local & Regional News

Arkansas local and regional news

Leslie Rutledge
Governor's Office / You Tube

A group seeking a public vote on expanded gambling in Arkansas is asking the state Supreme Court to force Attorney General Leslie Rutledge to approve and certify the ballot title.

The group Driving Arkansas Forward filed a petition Tuesday with the state's high court.

Driving Arkansas Forward is trying to put a proposal on the November ballot to legalize casinos in Jefferson and Pope counties, as well as at the Oaklawn horse track in Hot Springs and at the Southland greyhound track in West Memphis.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson talking with reporters in his office at the state Capitol.
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Gov. Asa Hutchinson has asked the Arkansas Supreme Court to expedite an appeal of a judge’s order blocking the issuance of medical marijuana cultivation licenses. He also said Monday that President Donald Trump is ”winning on better trade deals for America” but cautioned against engaging in a trade war with China.

Speaking to reporters in his office Monday, Hutchinson said the state has no choice but to wait for the Supreme Court regarding medical marijuana cultivation licenses.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson speaking with reporters Monday in his office at the state Capitol.
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The governor of Arkansas is proposing increasing a property tax credit that thousands of homeowners receive for their primary residence.

Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson told reporters on Monday he'll ask lawmakers next year to increase the state's homestead tax credit from $350 a year to $375. Hutchinson says the increased credit will cost an additional $18 million a year.

Sister Rosetta Tharpe
Chris Ware/Getty Images/NPR.org

Sister Rosetta Tharpe, an Arkansas-native who influenced musicians later credited with creating rock and roll, is one of six acts being inducted this year into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Born in the Woodruff County town of Cotton Plant in 1915, Tharpe is being posthumously inducted during a ceremony Saturday night in Cleveland.

Tharpe rose to fame in the 1930s, breaking boundaries by being an African-American woman who sang while playing an electric guitar with heavy distortion. Her style would later be adopted by blues performers and iconic rock guitarists.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A North Little Rock engineering firm has been chosen to begin design on the Southwest Trail, a 67 mile biking and walking path that will connect Hot Springs and Little Rock. Garver LLC will begin the preliminary design, which is also called the “65 percent” design.

Arkansas Department of Education

The Arkansas Department of Education has released new figures grading schools based on weighted standardized test scores, graduation rates, and overall school quality.

Arkansas officials have halted their evaluation of applications to sell medical marijuana after a judge struck down the state's licensing process for businesses that want to grow the drug.

Elaine Race Massacre
Arkansas State Archives

King cotton’s prices were on the rise, but the black sharecroppers who picked it were not benefiting. It was Sept. 30, 1919, and the harvest was about to get underway.

About 100 sharecroppers met at a church in the town of Elaine, a small town in Phillips County that sits in the vast Mississippi Delta Region. Armed black guards protected the people inside. Suddenly, white men appeared outside.

Workgroups organized by AFMC are trying to combat adverse childhood experiences.
Creative Commons

A recent study published by Child Trends found that 56 percent of children in Arkansas have had at least one adverse childhood experience, or ACE, compared to the national average of 45 percent. That's the highest of any state in the nation. An ACE is defined as a "potentially traumatic event, ranging from abuse and neglect to living with an adult with a mental illness. They can have negative, lasting effects on health and well-being in childhood or later in life."

Wendell Griffen
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

An Arkansas judge's efforts to obtain documents and testimony from the state Supreme Court on its decision to bar him from hearing any death penalty cases has been put on hold.

The high court asked for the delay until a federal judge decides whether to allow a lawsuit against the justices to proceed.

U.S. District Judge James M. Moody Jr. on Monday granted a request to temporarily stay discovery in Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen's lawsuit. That suit challenges justices' decision to bar him from any cases involving the death penalty.

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