News

Daniel Breen / KUAR News

Fans of the outdoors in central Arkansas are likely familiar with the distinctive peak of Pinnacle Mountain State Park. Now, just slightly west of the park, a 373-acre tract of land is part of the state System of Natural Areas.

The Rattlesnake Ridge Natural Area was originally owned by Lee and Beverly Bodenhamer, who reached out to Nature Conservancy of Arkansas Director Scott Simon in an effort to preserve the land. The Nature Conservancy handed the land over to the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, which is part of the Department of Arkansas Heritage.

election voter ID vote
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas' highest court says the state can enforce a voter ID law in the May 22 primary despite a judge declaring the measure unconstitutional.

The state Supreme Court decision Wednesday overruled a Pulaski County judge who had blocked the law's enforcement. The primary is on May 22, and early voting begins Monday.

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Alice Gray ruled the law was unconstitutional on April 26, and issued a preliminary injunction blocking the state's enforcement of the law less than a month before primary elections. 

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson looking at demonstrators outside of Parris Tower in Little Rock.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson made three stops in central Arkansas on Tuesday and was greeted at each destination by demonstrators opposed to his recent proposals for new public housing restrictions. 

Take a listen to the audio link above for the story.

Daniel Breen / KUAR News

Politicians, artists and fans of the performing arts gathered outside The Arkansas Repertory Theatre building on Main Street to show support for the venue during a time when its future is uncertain. The Rep is Arkansas's largest non-profit and professional theater company. 

The Rep announced last week it was suspending operations, saying it is facing mounting debt and declining ticket sales. The theatre’s website says its most pressing need is $750,000 to pay off its operating debt.

A Washington-based group is preparing to launch television ads targeting Arkansas Supreme Court Justice Courtney Goodson in her re-election bid, two years after it spent more than $600,000 on spots aimed at Goodson during her unsuccessful campaign to lead the high court.

Filings with the Federal Communications Commission indicate that the Judicial Crisis Network has spent more than $96,000 to air ads in the Little Rock and northwest Arkansas areas over the next week. A filing from one station says the ads focused on criticism of Goodson.

Daniel Breen / KUAR News

With early voting for primary elections set to begin May 7, the four Democrats seeking to run against Republican incumbent French Hill for Arkansas’s 2nd District U.S. Congressional seat gathered for their second debate Monday.

A rally will take place Tuesday afternoon in support of the Arkansas Repertory Theatre. It comes after last week’s announcement that The Rep was suspending operations because of financial problems. Since then people have been discussing ways to help the theater resume operations.

Skip Rutherford, dean of the Clinton School of Public Service, is helping to organize Tuesday's event, which begins at 5 p.m. in front of The Rep at 601 Main Street in Little Rock.

Rutherford spoke with KUAR in advance of the rally. You can listen to the interview above or read a transcript below.

In the Republican gubernatorial primary, incumbent Asa Hutchinson has secured an endorsement from Arkansas Right to Life. In a statement, Hutchinson praised the group and touted lengthening waiting periods for women to get an abortion, parental consent laws, and blocking Medicaid funding to Planned Parenthood.

C-SPAN

Ben Carson, the one-time presidential candidate and current Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, is making several stops in North Little Rock on Tuesday. It comes as

Ben Fry
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Toys of Desperation, a posthumously-released novel, written by longtime KUAR Station Manager Ben Fry is being featured as part of the Arkansas Literary Festival this weekend.

The book, published by Et. Alia Press, is about Billy Williams, who lives in the fictional town of Weir Arkansas. He traverses the town on his bike crossing the railroad tracks, while the 1973 Watergate hearings are being televised. Billy Williams hears the voice of his father and sets out to find what it is that his father is telling him.

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