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Remembrances
3:25 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Remembering Paul Mazursky, A Filmmaker With An Ear For His Era

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 6:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Filmmaker Paul Mazursky has died. The writer and director captured the spirit of his times in such comedies as "Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice" and "An Unmarried Woman." Mazursky died yesterday in Los Angeles at the age of 84. And joining us now to talk about him is our film critic, Bob Mondello. Hi, Bob.

BOB MONDELLO, BYLINE: Hi.

SIEGEL: Mazursky had a very extensive career. Tell us about it.

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Politics
3:10 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Lawmakers Pitch A Gas Tax Hike To Replenish Dwindling Highway Funds

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 6:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Let's take a closer look now at what's happening to the Highway Trust Fund. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx warned state officials in a letter today that unless the fund is patched quickly, the federal government will start limiting payouts to states on August 1. The average state will lose nearly 30 percent of its federal road money and that could mean a lot less asphalt. NPR's Scott Horsley reports on one idea for fixing the trust fund and the roadblocks in front of it.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

U.S. Bounced Out Of World Cup By Belgium, Ending Team's Run

The U.S. team is taking on Belgium for a chance to move on to the quarterfinals.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 11:50 am

The U.S. team's dramatic and unexpected run in the World Cup came to an end today in Salvador, Brazil.

For 90 minutes, the score was tied at 0-0. Belgium attacked and attacked, but U.S. goal keeper Tim Howard held them off with save after save in spectacular fashion. By some counts, Howard had the most saves in World Cup history.

But as the game went into extra time, however, Howard couldn't hold back the attacks.

Belgium scored its first goal a couple of minutes in, and then quickly added another one.

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NPR Story
2:48 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

World Cup: The Loser Goes Home

Today in Brazil, it’s do or die, one and done, all or nothing — and any other sports cliche you can think of to describe the winner-take-all World Cup match between the U.S. and Belgium.

Doug Tribou of NPR’s Only A Game tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that while Belgium is the favorite, the “Red Devils” are pretty banged up and some of their key players may not take to the pitch. Meanwhile, U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann says his team will be going on the attack.

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NPR Story
2:48 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Fireworks Business 'Shaken' By Fatal Accident

Brandon Weaver, right, and his fellow crew members pose in the back of a Budget rental truck. They say being back at work is helping them cope with the death of their co-worker. (Northwest News Network)

July 4th is a day to celebrate the birth of a nation with parades, picnics and in many communities, fireworks.

People in the pyrotechnic business say their job is to entertain people. But the splendor and thrill of a magnificent fireworks display can come with a price.

Last month, a longtime seasonal employee of Entertainment Fireworks, Inc., one of the largest fireworks companies in the Northwest, was killed in an on-the-job explosion and fire.

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NPR Story
2:48 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Supreme Court Solidifies Position On Birth Control

The U.S. Supreme Court is shown June 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Today the U.S. Supreme Court left in place lower court rulings in favor of businesses that objected to covering all forms of birth control mandated for coverage in the Affordable Care Act.

It’s a strong indication that the court’s ruling yesterday extending religious rights to “closely held” companies, applies broadly to all forms of birth control covered by the mandate, rather than just the four types objected to by Hobby Lobby and Conestoga.

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All Tech Considered
2:46 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Do Feelings Compute? If Not, The Turing Test Doesn't Mean Much

Vertigo3d iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 3:20 pm

To judge from some of the headlines, it was a very big deal. At an event held at the Royal Society in London, for the first time ever, a computer passed the Turing Test, which is widely taken as the benchmark for saying a machine is engaging in intelligent thought. But like the other much-hyped triumphs of artificial intelligence, this one wasn't quite what it appeared. Computers can do things that seem quintessentially human, but they usually take a different path to get there.

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The Salt
2:46 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

Paul Greenberg says the decline of local fish markets, and the resulting sequestration of seafood to a corner of our supermarkets, has contributed to "the facelessness and comodification of seafood."
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 11:09 am

What's the most popular seafood in the U.S.? Shrimp. The average American eats more shrimp per capita than tuna and salmon combined. Most of that shrimp comes from Asia, and most of the salmon we eat is also imported. In fact, 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad, but one-third of the seafood Americans catch gets sold to other countries.

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The Two-Way
1:57 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

FTC Alleges T-Mobile Charged Customers Millions In Bogus Charges

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 6:49 pm

The Federal Trade Commission filed a complaint on Tuesday, alleging that wireless provider T-Mobile made hundreds of millions of dollars on bogus charges against its customers.

Essentially, the FTC claims that T-Mobile knew that its customers never ordered text message subscriptions for things like "flirting tips, horoscope information or celebrity gossip," but it still continued to charge them $9.99 a month for the service.

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Shots - Health News
1:53 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

State Of The Painkiller Nation: Wide Variation In Prescription Rates

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 9:35 am

There's no getting around the fact that the abuse of prescription painkillers is a huge problem in the U.S. Prescription drug overdoses now kill more people each year than car crashes.

But the overdose risks vary quite a bit depending on where in the country you live. One reason is that how often doctors prescribed the drugs, such as Percocet, Vicodin and generic opioids, varies widely by state.

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