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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Jazz Pianist, Composer Horace Silver Dies At 85

American jazz pianist Horace Silver performs at the North Sea Jazz Festival in The Hague, Netherlands, in 1988.
Frans Schellekens Redferns/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 4:43 pm

This post was updated at 5:40 p.m. ET.

Pianist and composer Horace Silver, who created a rhythmic jazz known as "hard bop" that combined R&B and gospel to go along with his eclectic style of piano playing, has died at age 85, his son confirms.

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This Is NPR
3:04 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Creating Community: Stories About Life In Wisconsin

Google

When you think of Wisconsin, cheese, beer and the Green Bay Packers probably come to mind. How about endangered languages? Many folks in Wisconsin likely hadn't realized the linguistic diversity of their state, either – nor the threats facing these languages – before listening to a story on Wisconsin Life, a series on Wisconsin Public Radio.

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Shots - Health News
2:14 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Doctors Aren't Sure How To Stop Africa's Deadliest Ebola Outbreak

A health worker from Doctors Without Borders examines Ebola patient Finda Marie Kamano, 33, at her home in Conakry, Guinea, in April. The outbreak that began in February is still spreading in West Africa.
Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos/Courtesy of Doctors Without Borders

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:24 am

When an Ebola outbreak lasts for months and continues to show up in new cities, health officials take notice.

That's exactly what's happening in West Africa. An outbreak that started in Guinea last February has surged in the past few weeks. It's now the deadliest outbreak since the virus was first detected in 1976.

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Shots - Health News
2:08 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Someday Soon You May Swallow A Computer With Your Pill

The company Proteus has developed a computer that attaches to a pill and tracks the pill's absorption into the body. The technology has passed clinical trials.
iStock

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:24 am

What if you could swallow a computer the size of a poppy seed, and it could report back exactly if and when you took a medicine while recording how your body responded to the drug?

It sounds crazy, but the tiny computers exist. It sounds dangerous, but they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. And the company that makes them, Proteus, has tens of millions of dollars and relationships with some of the biggest drug companies in the world, including Novartis.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

In 'The Rover,' Guy Pearce Takes A Bleak Road Trip

Guy Pearce is pictured in a still from “The Rover.” (A24)

The new film “The Rover” is set in Australia, 10 years after the country has collapsed and degenerated into barbarism.

English-born Australian actor Guy Pearce plays a drifter whose car is stolen and who’s determined to get it back, no matter what the cost.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Dick Cheney's Op-Ed And The Return Of The Neocon

Former U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney listens as his wife Lynne Cheney speaks about her book "James Madison: A Life Reconsidered" May 12, 2014 in Washington, DC. ( Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 8:56 pm

Architects and proponents of the Iraq War are now back with criticism of President Obama’s foreign policy.

Leading the group is former Vice President Dick Cheney, who co-wrote an op-ed with his daughter Liz Cheney in today’s Wall Street Journal. The subtitle reads, “Rarely has a U.S. President been so wrong about so much at the expense of so many.”

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs magazine, discusses what neoconservatives are saying about President Obama and Iraq with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

American Airlines To End Most Flights To Venezuela

A man walks next to an American Airlines ticket sale office in Caracas on June 17, 2014. American Airlines announced earlier today that it will cut almost 80 percent of its weekly flights to Venezuela, on account of a USD 750 million debt that the Venezuelan government holds with them. The government of President Nicolas Maduro owes several international airlines USD 4,200 million, which made two of them close down their operations in Venezuela and others to implement deep cutbacks. (LEO RAMIREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 7:23 am

American Airlines is cutting nearly 80 percent of its flights between the U.S. and Venezuela starting in July, because the Venezuelan government owes it $750 million dollars in ticket revenue.

American is the largest foreign airline serving Venezuela, and it’s just the latest carrier to suspend most or all flights to the country.

The carrier is also scrapping all direct flights to Venezuela from New York, Dallas and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and will only fly there from Miami.

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Author Interviews
2:06 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Writer Reflects On Aircraft Carrier's Mission To The Persian Gulf

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Music
2:06 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

A Double Dose Of Ronald Shannon Jackson's Free-Funk

Two fine albums by drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson and the Decoding Society, Man Dance and its sequel Barbeque Dog, are now available again as downloads, after being out of print for ages. Fresh Air critic Kevin Whitehead says they're prime examples of the 1980s' so-called "free-funk" movement.

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The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Fed Slows Pace Of Bond Buying, Keeps Rates Steady — For Now

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks during a news conference at the Federal Reserve in Washington, on Wednesday. The Fed announced that it was cutting back on bond buying and would leave short-term rates unchanged.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 6:03 pm

This post was updated at 5:30 p.m. ET.

The Federal Reserve said today it will further curtail its bond purchases because of an improving U.S. job market, but it offered no hint as to when it might start raising short-term interest rates.

A statement from the Federal Reserve Open Market Committee said:

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