NPR News

Updated at 5:17 p.m. ET

As the chaos of the past 24 hours settles in Spain, a clearer picture of the human cost in Barcelona and Cambrils is beginning to emerge — and one thing, at least, is becoming more apparent by the hour: Spain's deadliest terror attack in more than a decade claimed lives and damaged others from just about every continent.

As the war rages in Syria, there have been efforts in Israel, its neighbor to the southwest, to lend a hand to Syrian civilians. The aid projects involve a mix of sympathy, secrecy, strategy — and sensitivity.

Israeli volunteers recently gathered in a warehouse to prepare boxes of children's medicine to be sent to Syria — but the Israeli company that runs the warehouse asked not to be identified because it did not want to be publicly associated with the initiative, according to one volunteer.

Rachel Abrams of The New York Times and Cardiff Garcia of FT Alphaville join us to discuss the week's business and economics news. On Friday, Stephen Bannon was pushed out of his role as chief strategist to president Donald Trump. We discuss what the move can mean for the markets. Also, we recap Trump’s stance on the violence in Charlottesville. With Trump alienating corporate America and Republicans admonishing him, can the White House withstand the latest political whiplash thrown its way?

China’s government today unveiled new rules for overseas investments by Chinese businesses. The rules discourage companies from what are called "irrational" acquisitions of assets in industries ranging from real estate to hotels and entertainment.  In recent years, China has invested heavily in the U.S. What will the new rules mean for U.S. businesses?

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The cargo shipping industry is turning things around

Aug 18, 2017

After the Great Recession, the cargo shipping industry overestimated how fast the consumer economy would bounce back. It’s been a tough few years, with empty space on many cargo ships that carry furniture, clothes and office supplies — pretty much all the stuff Americans buy in stories. But now, old ships are getting replaced with a fewer number of new, bigger vessels, owned by fewer companies. All that efficiency has freight rates climbing.

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Though the violence has ended in Charlottesville, Va., debates and protests continue and Confederate statues and monuments are being removed all over the country.

Work crews took down a statue of former Chief Justice of the United States Roger Taney overnight in Annapolis, Md., where it had stood since 1872.

Spanish police say they've arrested four people in connection to terrorist attacks that killed 14 people and injured more than 100 others in and around Barcelona Thursday. Five suspects were killed as they tried to carry out a second terrorist attack in a nearby city.

The current location of the driver of a white van that plowed through a crowd of people on Barcelona's landmark Las Ramblas boulevard Thursday afternoon remains unknown.

Greenbelt, Maryland, can't hide its town pride

Aug 18, 2017

The U.S. government tried a different approach to public housing during the great depression by creating entire towns that were federally planned and subsidized. The idea was to build communities where poor Americans and displaced farmers could work. Only three of these "greenbelt towns" were built before the project ended. But those three towns still stand today as a reminder of the New Deal's history.

There is a lot of debate around office etiquette. In the past, Marketplace Weekend has spoken with Ask A Manager's Alison Green about the right way to handle job interviews and how to dress for the office. Now we're taking on the topic of kids at work. Is it ever appropriate?

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