NPR News

Seattle tries voucher system to reform campaign finance

18 hours ago
Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

The city of Seattle is trying out a campaign finance experiment in city elections using a voucher system to give money to candidates.

In January, residents received four $25 vouchers, paid for with taxpayer funds, that they can give to their candidates of choice for offices such as city council.

“It was like getting a little check from your grandma,” Seattle resident Dakota Solberg said of the dark blue slips of paper that arrived in his mailbox recently.

02/21/17: The electric-car economy

19 hours ago
Marketplace

A Volkswagen subsidiary will invest about $2 billion in electric cars over the next decade, as part of VW's settlement in the emissions cheating case.  We'll look at the challenges that an electric-car ecosystem faces. Next, attorney Jenny Afia will join us to talk about her role in rewriting apps' privacy policy for the British government.

 

 

Marketplace

About 20 million people are at risk of starvation within the next six months. We'll look at the four different food crises that are all happening at once. Next, we'll talk about Home Depot's earnings growth, despite a lack of new stores, and a Philadelphia law that prevents companies from asking job applicants about past salaries.

Thomas Jefferson wrote the famous words "all men are created equal," but he also owned more than 600 slaves over the course of his life.

His Virginia plantation called Monticello is being renovated to shed more light on the enslaved people who lived and worked there.

One of the most notable of those slaves was Sally Hemings. Jefferson is widely believed to have fathered her six children. The museum is working to restore a restroom believed to be Hemings' living quarters.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In June 2010, 15-year-old Sergio Hernandez and his friends were playing chicken at the U.S.-Mexico border, daring each other to run up and touch the tall border fence separating Juarez, Mexico, from El Paso, Texas.

At some point during their game, U.S. border patrol agent Jesus Mesa arrived on a bicycle. He detained one of the kids on the U.S. side while the others ran away. Hernandez hid behind a pillar beneath a bridge on the Mexican side of the border. A cellphone video shows the boy peeking out from behind the column, before Mesa shoots and kills him.

Over the weekend President Trump’s sons Eric and Don Jr. were in Dubai at the grand opening of the Trump International Golf Club there. His sons have taken over management of the Trump Organization, though Donald Trump still owns it — just one of many potential conflicts of interest raising flags among experts.

New York Times reporter Scott Shane (@ScottShaneNYT) joins Here & Now‘s Eric Westervelt to discuss the front-page story that Shane co

Pages