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10:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Japan Releases Inmate After Nearly A Half-Century On Death Row

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

A court in Japan recently released Iwao Hakamada, thought to be the world's longest-serving death row inmate. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with David Johnson, an expert on Japan's legal system.

Commentary
10:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

In Uganda, The Fastest Public Transport Is DIY

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Stand on almost any corner in Kampala, Uganda and you'll be swarmed by a buzzing throng of men on motorcycles. These are the bota botas, the country's DIY public transportation system. Hop on and for a dollar or two you can go pretty much anywhere you want. During a recent visit to Uganda, Julie Caine of member station KALW, took a ride.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRAFFIC)

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Atlanta Archbishop Will Sell Mansion Built With Church Money

This new $2.2 million mansion brought a backlash against Atlanta Archbishop Wilton Gregory, who says he will move out of the house in the city's upscale Buckhead neighborhood.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 8:29 am

The archbishop of Atlanta is apologizing for building a multimillion-dollar home with money earmarked for charitable use. Anger erupted over Archbishop Wilton Gregory's $2.2 million mansion last month. The Tudor-style mansion is in Buckhead, one of the city's priciest neighborhoods.

From Atlanta, member station WABE's Jim Burress reports:

"Atlanta's Archbishop says he was wrong to spend so much money.

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NPR Story
9:42 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Global Grannies Don't Sweat Travel Headaches

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Over the past year we've brought you many adventure stories - the world's most traveled man, a journey by cargo ship and an octogenarian sailing to Antarctica.

(MUSIC)

MARTIN: On this week's Winging It, we introduce you to three adventurers who have dubbed themselves the Global Grannies. They're a group of women in their 50s and well into their 80s, who have started second lives as world travelers.

JODY NUNLEY: I'm Jody Nunley from Billings.

TANA: I'm Tana.

JO LOU KNOLL: And I'm Jo Lou Knoll.

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NPR Story
9:42 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Fort Hood Shooting Reopened Wounds At Trauma Unit

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. U.S. Army officials are saying that an argument may have set off Specialist Ivan Lopez, who went on a shooting rampage at Fort Hood this past week. He killed four people, including himself, and injured 16 others. Those who survived were taken to Baylor Scott and White Hospital nearby in Temple, Texas. Dr. Matthew Davis is the head of the trauma program there. He and his staff also treated the injured after the 2009 mass shooting at Fort Hood.

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NPR Story
9:42 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Born A Slave, Street Performer Was First Black Recording Artist

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

In 1890, George Washington Johnson became the first African-American to make commercial records. The Library of Congress is now adding Johnson's "The Laughing Song" to the National Recording Registry.

Remembrances
9:34 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Peter Matthiessen, Co-Founder Of The Paris Review, Dies At 86

Peter Matthiessen, shown here at his New York house in 2004, was a Zen Buddhist priest, a spy, an activist and a well-respected writer of both fiction and nonfiction.
Ed Betz AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 12:34 pm

Author Peter Matthiessen has died in New York at the age of 86 from acute myeloid leukemia. Matthiessen, a novelist and naturalist, wrote 33 books; among his best-known works are The Snow Leopard and the novels Far Tortuga and At Play in the Fields of the Lord, which was made into a Hollywood film.

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The Two-Way
9:31 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Mudslide Tragedy: Donations Outpace Capacity In Oso

Gabriella Botamanenko (center left) hugs her mother, Angela Botamanenko, during a vigil for mudslide victims at the Darrington Community Center Saturday. A March 22 mudslide in a nearby community killed at least 30 and left many missing.
David Ryder Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 10:46 am

It's been two weeks since the massive mudslide came down on a tiny mountain community in Washington state. The disaster killed 30 people; 13 are still missing. The tragedy prompted an outpouring of donations — and officials in Oso say they don't have room for more items.

Federal disaster relief officials are visiting the site Sunday, as member station KUOW's Sara Lerner reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Search For Flight MH370: Ship Detects Pulse Signal Again

Angus Houston, head of the Joint Agency Coordination Center leading the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, says ships are being sent to investigate reports of a signal being detected on a frequency used by black box equipment.
Tony Ashby AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 1:42 pm

Ships and search planes are being sent to investigate a pulse signal that a Chinese patrol ship outfitted with a black-box detector picked up twice this weekend, says Australia's Angus Houston, who is leading the international search effort for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet. But he adds that it's too early to say whether the signal is a breakthrough in the search.

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The Two-Way
7:26 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Peter Matthiessen Dies At 86; Wrote Of Travels In The Natural World

Writer Peter Matthiessen died Saturday at age 86 after a long fight with leukemia, according to his publisher. Here, he stands in the yard of his house in Sagaponack, N.Y., in 2004.
Ed Betz AP

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 10:31 am

Author Peter Matthiessen, who used fiction and nonfiction to explore how man relates to nature, has died at 86. The revered naturalist and novelist had been suffering from leukemia; he died Saturday afternoon, his publisher confirmed.

In a career that began in the 1950s, Matthiessen connected readers to people and places that were being irrevocably changed by the modern world. And in the process, he often gave them a window into the changes that shaped his own life, as well.

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