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3:23 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

A Red July 4th Weekend Leaves Dozens Of Casualties In Chicago

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Chicago, there were many shootings over the July 4 weekend. Police say nine Chicago residents were killed; more than 50 were injured. At least eight people who were shot were shot by police. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports.

CHERYL CORLEY, BYLINE: Chicago police superintendent Garry McCarthy says his department had a plan over the July 4 holiday that included putting hundreds of more officers on the city streets when and where they were needed.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Religion
3:19 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Pope Meets Sex Abuse Victims, Bearing A Plea For Forgiveness

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

At the Vatican today Pope Francis had his first meeting with victims of clergy. He vowed to hold bishops accountable for the protection of children. The meeting came nearly 16 months after Francis was elected. Victim support groups said it was long overdue. For more on this NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us from Rome. Hello Sylvia.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI, BYLINE: Hello, Robert.

SIEGEL: And I understand the Pope held a Mass with these victims, including a dramatic homily. What did he say?

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Middle East
3:19 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

In Jerusalem, And Caught In A Crossfire Of Thrown Stones

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 6:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Latin America
3:19 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

In Brazil, Pacification Paves Way For Baby Steps To Democracy

Two young men play street soccer in the Rio de Janeiro shantytown of Vidigal on May 14.
Marcelo Sayao EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:16 pm

As World Cup travelers in Brazil flock to Rio de Janeiro for the tournament's final, many are staying in newly pacified favelas, or low-income neighborhoods.

Among the most popular is Vidigal, which rises up a steep hillside over some of Rio's most scenic beaches and offers some of the city's most beautiful views. A government program to drive crime from the historically violent slum has attracted entrepreneurs and investors and also nurtured a step toward democracy.

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

More Than 50 People Were Shot In Chicago Over The Holiday Weekend

Police investigate the scene of a shooting at 75th Street and Stewart Avenue on Saturday in Chicago. At least 50 people were shot in the city, nine of them fatally, in a wave of violence over the Fourth of July weekend.
E. Jason Wambsgans MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 4:15 pm

At least 50 people were shot in Chicago, 12 of them fatally, in a wave of violence over the long Fourth of July holiday weekend.

The Chicago Tribune called it "the greatest burst of gun violence Chicago has seen this year."

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Shots - Health News
3:07 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

The Secret History Behind The Science Of Stress

Camel marketed smoke breaks at work as time spent relaxing instead of stressing. Camel, 1964.
Stanford University

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 2:47 pm

The modern idea of stress began on a rooftop in Canada, with a handful of rats freezing in the winter wind.

This was 1936 and by that point the owner of the rats, an endocrinologist named Hans Selye, had become expert at making rats suffer for science.

"He would subject them to extreme temperatures, make them go hungry for long periods, or make them exercise a lot," the medical historian Mark Jackson says. "Then what he would do is kill the rats and look at their organs."

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NPR Story
2:12 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Little Library Causes Big Zoning Controversy

Spencer Collins, 9, with his Little Free Library that a neighbor complained was an eyesore and violated the town's zoning ordinances. (Sarah Collins)

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 9:02 am

Note: See an update on this story here.

City leaders in Leawood, Kansas tonight will take up 9-year-old Spencer Collins‘ Little Free Library.

The boy had put up a slightly larger than a birdfeeder box containing a free book exchange in his front yard, but a neighbor complained it was an eyesore and “an illegal detached structure” that violated the town’s zoning ordinances.

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NPR Story
2:12 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Ukrainian Parliamentarian: Ukraine 'A Test' For Europe And Russia

Olga Bielkova, a member of Ukraine’s parliament says, “what is happening between us and Russia right now is a threat to the whole of Europe; Russia is just testing grounds for what it could to do other countries.”

Bielkova told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that Ukraine is better prepared to take on pro-Russian separatists, and she thinks that the government will begin winning hearts in Eastern Ukraine where pro-Russian sentiment runs strong.

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NPR Story
2:12 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

GoPro Spawns New Category Of Wearable Cameras

Snowboarder Shaun White is pictured wearing a GoPro camera. (GoPro.com)

GoPro stock options began trading today, less than two weeks after it went public. The company, which makes wearable point-of-view action cameras, has come a long way since it was born 10 years ago. GoPro is now one of the best selling cameras in the world, and it’s spawned a whole new category of cameras.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Lauren Goode, reporter and review columnist for Re/code, about GoPro’s success, its competitors and the future of wearable cameras.

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Code Switch
1:23 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Asian-American Leadership Programs Tackle The 'Bamboo Ceiling'

Former Cisco Vice President Buck Gee speaks at the Advance Leadership Program for Asian-American Executives at Stanford University in 2011.
Dai Sugano/San Jose Mercury News MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 9:28 am

In the last few pages of a recent issue of The Economist, we spotted an advertisement for a leadership program specifically for Asian-American executives. The program charges $11,000 in tuition for a five-day session at Stanford Graduate School of Business.

The purpose, says co-founder Buck Gee, is to provide companies with an "immediate solution" to tackle the lack of Asian-Americans in leadership roles.

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