Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

In Gay Marriage's New Landscape, Glee, Confusion And Resistance

Kody Partridge (center right) and her partner, Lauri Wood, kiss at a same-sex marriage celebration Monday in Salt Lake City. The status of gay marriage remains uncertain in Kansas and Wyoming, where officials say no court has ruled on their ban specifically.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 2:41 pm

Same-sex couples are marrying in at least six more states today, after the Supreme Court left in place lower courts' rulings against bans on gay marriage. But couples have been turned away in Kansas, one of several states that share federal jurisdiction with states where bans were lifted.

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The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Mon October 6, 2014

Some Americans Boosted Charitable Giving In Recession; The Rich Did Not

During the recession, middle-class and poor Americans gave more of their incomes to charity organizations than did the wealthy, according to a new study.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 11:44 am

As times got tough in the recent recession, the less well-off of America's citizens became more generous when giving to charity. But at the same time, wealthy Americans cut the proportion of their incomes they donated, according to a new study that analyzed data from tax returns.

NPR's Pam Fessler reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
9:05 am
Mon October 6, 2014

Supreme Court Won't Hear Gay Marriage Cases In New Term

The Supreme Court has denied petitions to review same-sex marriage cases in several states, including Utah. In January, supporters of same-sex marriage held a rally at Utah's Capitol in Salt Lake City.
Jim Urquhart Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 6, 2014 1:15 pm

The Supreme Court's new term will not include any cases that might decide the issue of same-sex marriage in the U.S., a development that comes after many lower and appeals courts have ruled against states' bans on gay marriage. Advocates on both sides of the issue have been calling for the high court to review the issue and make an official ruling.

The court's refusal of all the petitions related to bans on gay marriage means that the appeals courts' decisions allowing gay marriage can now take effect. They had been on hold pending a potential review by the Supreme Court.

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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Mon October 6, 2014

Hewlett-Packard Will Split Into Two Companies

Meg Whitman, the current president and CEO of Hewlett-Packard, will lead one of the two companies the tech giant is creating by dividing its corporate services and printing/PC units.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Mon October 6, 2014 5:30 pm

Computer giant Hewlett-Packard, a stalwart through decades of shifts in America's technology landscape, is dividing itself into two companies in its most drastic attempt yet to adjust to new markets.

The ailing company that was founded 75 years ago in a Palo Alto garage was synonymous with Silicon Valley.

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The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Sat October 4, 2014

Photo Break: America Puts On Its Fall Colors

A striking image of autumn trees lining a drive in Vermont.
reinschreiber Instagram

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 8:03 pm

October brings the peak of the autumn foliage season in many U.S. states, drawing both tourists and camera lenses. Thanks to the NPR community, we've collected a few photos that are worth taking a break from the news to stare at.

The photos were taken in a variety of states — except, of course, those where the season hasn't begun to turn. If you're heading out to see the autumn views, the USDA has a map showing where the leaves are turning; in many states, local agencies can provide more tailored information.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Sat October 4, 2014

Haiti's 'Baby Doc' Duvalier Dies At 63

Former Haitian president Jean-Claude Duvalier "Baby Doc" has died at age 63. He returned from exile in 2011.
Hector Retamal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 1:46 pm

Jean-Claude Duvalier, the former Haitian dictator nicknamed "Baby Doc" after he succeeded his father in ruling the country, has died. Duvalier was the president of Haiti from 1971 to 1986, a brutal regime that ended in his exile. He returned to the country in 2011.

Duvalier died of a heart attack, reports Haiti Libre.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Sat October 4, 2014

Dallas Ebola Case: Experts Say 9 People At Highest Risk Of Contact

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins, right, escorts people who were at the apartment unit where Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian citizen diagnosed with the Ebola virus, had been staying. Jenkins used his car to drive the people to a new place to stay in Dallas.
JIM YOUNG Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 1:37 pm

Of the 114 people whom officials first thought could possibly have been exposed to the Liberian man diagnosed with Ebola in Texas, health experts are "fairly certain" that only nine had enough direct contact that they could potentially have been infected.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Sat October 4, 2014

Hong Kong Police Can 'Take All Actions Necessary,' City Leader Says

A police officer tries to hold back pro-democracy student protesters during a clash with local residents in Mong Kok, Hong Kong, on Saturday.
Wally Santana AP

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 1:25 pm

Violence echoed in Hong Kong's streets on Saturday, as clashes between pro-democracy protesters and counter-protesters continued. Occupy Central organizers say their supporters have been attacked by pro-Beijing groups that include gang members. City officials say the streets need to be clear by Monday.

Discussions between the protesters and the government broke down after the violence. With thousands of protesters still in the streets, some are fearing that a crackdown might be imminent.

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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Sat October 4, 2014

A First: Uterus Transplant Gives Parents A Healthy Baby

Dr. Mats Brannstrom and his team perform a womb transplant operation in April. Brannstrom says they delivered a healthy baby boy to a uterine transplant recipient last month, a first in medical science.
Johan Wingborg AP

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 12:34 pm

In what's being hailed as a huge step in fertility and reproduction science, doctors in Sweden say a woman has given birth to a baby boy less than two years after she received a uterus transplant. The new mother, 36, had been born without a uterus, so another woman, 61, donated her womb several years after she had gone through menopause.

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Sat October 4, 2014

The Two Koreas Agree To Hold High-Level Talks This Autumn

North Korea's National Defense Commission Vice Chairman Hwang Pyong So, middle, waves as the country's athletes march at the end of the Asian Games. He's flanked by Workers Party Secretary Choe Ryong Hae, right, and South Korea's Kim Kwan-jin, left, national security adviser to South Korea's president.
Dita Alangkara AP

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 12:29 pm

In a sign of potential improvement in their frosty relationship, North and South Korea will engage in high-level talks by early November. The revelation came as a delegation of North Korean officials ventured south to Incheon for Saturday's closing ceremonies in the 2014 Asian Games.

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