Chris Hickey

Reporter / Anchor

Chris Hickey was born and raised in Houston, Texas, spending his teenage years in Camden, Ohio. He graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, majoring in English. He got his start in public radio working as a board operator at WMUB in Oxford, Ohio during his summer and winter breaks from school. Since graduating, he has made Little Rock home. He joined KUAR in September 2011 as a production intern and has since enjoyed producing, anchoring and reporting for the station. He is the composer of KUAR's Week-In-Review Podcast theme music and the associate producer of Arts & Letters

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On this edition of KUAR's Week-In-Review Podcast we sit down with Bobby Ampezzan and Sarah Whites-Koditschek of Arkansas Public Media to talk about the story that has consumed the state this week: the first execution carried out in 12 years. We discuss the night of the execution, the legal developments leading up to it — including decisions by state and federal courts — and have a look ahead to next week when three more executions are scheduled.

clintonschool.uasys.edu

As the first 100 days of the of Donald Trump’s presidency draw to an end, Arkansas’s Junior U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton fielded questions about the chief executive and the new administration for about an hour on Wednesday.

Cotton appeared with Clinton School of Public Service Dean Skip Rutherford at the Robinson Center in Little Rock. When asked about Trump’s proposed budget, which dramatically reduces funding for a number of government programs and departments, Cotton said Congress is unlikely to implement it line by line.

The Little Rock Board of Directors voted 7-1 Tuesday night in favor of a resolution to support extending a 12.4 mill tax to fund Little Rock schools. An election on the millage extension will be held on May 9.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has allowed several executions scheduled over the next ten days in Arkansas to proceed. The order by the three judge panel* lifts the stay by U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker that was issued over the weekend.

An Arkansas town with a population of about 10,000 will once again be host to one of the nation’s smallest but most enduring film festivals. The 16th annual Ozark Foothills FilmFest is kicking off Friday in Batesville. Screenings are happening on two consecutive weekends, April 14-15 and April 21-22, at the University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville.

Co-founder and executive director Judy Pest says this year’s slate of about 30 short and feature length films continues the festival’s somewhat challenging mission of showcasing depictions of rural life.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson is to talk with reporters Thursday morning about the pending executions of seven death row inmates. The governor scheduled the lethal injections over a 10-day period before the state's supply of one of the drugs used in the process expires.

How does going to church affect your view of politics? How does the message from the pulpit influence your level of community involvement? These were central issues in a research project involving dozens of students from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and the Clinton School of Public Service.

A federal judge temporarily blocks the execution of one man who’s among eight to die over a 10-day timetable this month. What does the state’s clemency process have to do with it?

-While a federal appeals court says Ohio can’t use a controversial lethal injection drug, we explore the issues surrounding midazolam—part of Arkansas’s three-drug cocktail.

-What’s Arkansas’s congressional response to President Trump ordering airstrikes against Syria’s Assad regime?

The Arkansas Supreme Court has denied requests to stay the executions of two death row inmates scheduled to die this month. The court denied requests from inmates Stacey Johnson and Ledell Lee. The court’s orders relate to the inmates’ post-conviction appeals process.

Transgender Arkansans faced higher levels of unemployment, poverty and psychological distress than the population at large in 2015. That's according to a new study from the National Center for Transgender Equality. Of the 222 Arkansas residents surveyed, 11 percent were unemployed, 37 percent were living in poverty and 44 percent experienced severe psychological distress in the month prior to completing the survey.

The center's Executive Director Mara Keisling says the state-based findings are consistent with the organization’s larger survey of 27,715 people from around the U.S.

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