Chris Hickey

Reporter / Anchor

Chris Hickey was born and raised in Houston, Texas, spending his teenage years in Camden, Ohio. He graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, majoring in English. He got his start in public radio working as a board operator at WMUB in Oxford, Ohio during his summer and winter breaks from school. Since graduating, he has made Little Rock home. He joined KUAR in September 2011 as a production intern and has since enjoyed producing, anchoring and reporting for the station. He is the composer of KUAR's Week-In-Review Podcast theme music and the associate producer of Arts & Letters

Ways to Connect

Nathan Vandiver / KUAR News / KUAR

Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola says he intends to run for reelection in 2018. Stodola’s statement comes after State Rep. Warwick Sabin announced over the weekend that he’s exploring a mayoral run. Stodola has been in office since 2007.

Chris Hickey / KUAR News

Arkansas legislators on Friday allowed a prohibition on the sale and use of dicamba to take effect. The Executive Subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council took no action on the proposed 120-day ban, a decision that upholds a ruling made last month by the Arkansas Plant Board. The ban will officially go into effect Tuesday at 12:01am unless members of the council move to reverse it.

2017 has seen a sharp increase in violent crime in Little Rock, but the nightclub shooting a week ago that injured 28 people left authorities saying something drastic needed to be done. Gov. Asa Hutchinson has brought together state and federal manpower in a coordinated effort to combat crime in the state's capitol city. We'll discuss what that will involve.

Also on the podcast, a proposed ban on the herbicide dicamba, which is blamed for extensive crop damage. And state revenue increases at the end of the budget year, leaving officials who had been nervous a few months ago with a surplus.

State Rep. Warwick Sabin (D-Little Rock)
Nathan Vandiver / KUAR

Democratic State Rep. Warwick Sabin has announced he’s exploring a run for Little Rock mayor in 2018. The announcement comes as Little Rock faces growing incidents of violent crime, a school district under state control, and a major interstate expansion project that has drawn the derision of many community groups.

In a press release, Sabin says he would promote new energy, create jobs, and improve education. The press release says he will “visit and listen to every corner of the city.”

Low unemployment, affordable housing, strong healthcare access and below-average poverty rates are the positives in the Little Rock Metropolitan area. Some negatives: a high crime rate, fewer professional and technical jobs than other cities, low employment specialization, and slow growth in the ratio of large to small businesses. That’s according to the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Arkansas Economic Development Institute’s fourth annual Little Rock Metro Report Card, released Thursday.

Chris Hickey / KUAR News

An executive subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council on Wednesday deferred a decision to Friday on whether to prohibit the sale and use of the herbicide dicamba for soybean and cotton crops. The proposed 120-day ban, approved by the Arkansas Plant Board last month and referred to the subcommittee by Gov. Asa Hutchinson, could prevent further widespread damage inflicted by the chemical on non-genetically resistant agricultural crops. 

University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service

This week the Arkansas Legislative Council may decide whether to approve a 120-day ban on the sale and use of the herbicide dicamba.

A controversial Ten Commandments monument was put on display this week at the Arkansas State Capitol, but less than 24 hours later it was destroyed.  We'll have an in-depth discussion about what happened to the monument.

Also this week we talk about Governor Hutchinson calling for changes to the healthcare bill that for now is stalled in the U.S. Senate. Lately there hasn't been much comment on the topic from Arkansas’s two senators.

marijuana
npr.org

Arkansans hoping to obtain medical marijuana can now apply for a patient card on the state Department of Health’s website. Prospective patients and caregivers can search through a page that includes instructions and resources detailing requirements for the application process. To apply online, patients and caregivers will need to have an email address, a written certification from their physician, a state-issued ID.  Applicants must pay a nonrefundable $50 fee.

Dicamba damage
University of Arkansas

The number of complaints in Arkansas linked to the potential misuse of the herbicide dicamba has risen.

The Arkansas Plant Board says residents of 20 counties have submitted more than 430 complaints linked to dicamba. A majority of complaints are concentrated in east Arkansas, with Mississippi County having the most. A few complaints have also popped up around central Arkansas, in Lonoke, Jefferson and White counties.

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