Chris Hickey

Reporter / Anchor

Chris Hickey was born and raised in Houston, Texas, spending his teenage years in Camden, Ohio. He graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, majoring in English. He got his start in public radio working as a board operator at WMUB in Oxford, Ohio during his summer and winter breaks from school. Since graduating, he has made Little Rock home. He joined KUAR in September 2011 as a production intern and has since enjoyed producing, anchoring and reporting for the station. He is the composer of KUAR's Week-In-Review Podcast theme music and the associate producer of Arts & Letters

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Arkansas Department of Health
Arkansas Department of Health

The Arkansas Department of Health will begin accepting applications for medical marijuana patient cards at the end of the month, according to an agency news release. The cards will be distributed to qualifying patients and caregivers in order to allow the purchase of medicine from licensed dispensaries. The Health Department says it will distribute the cards approximately 30 days before medical marijuana is available for sale in the state. That could be next year.

Chris Hickey / KUAR News

A maligned but crucial row crop herbicide that’s led to disputes among neighbors and at least one class action lawsuit could be on its way toward becoming banned in Arkansas.

The Arkansas Plant Board Pesticide Committee voted Friday to recommend a ban on the sale and use of dicamba for the state’s row crops. Farmers spray dicamba on a specific genetically resistant soybean variety, produced by Monsanto. Misuse and wind drift in recent months has led to the herbicide impacting fields and damaging non-genetically resistant agricultural crops in the eastern part of the state.

On this Week-In-Review, we put Arkansas's congressional delegation in the spotlight as Trump ignores the state's agricultural interests on his newly announced Cuba policies. Also, Sen. Tom Cotton dismisses Russia collusion and  Sen. Boozman is short on healthcare specifics.

-Elections were held throughout Arkansas this week: Pulaski County votes to send more money to schools; Pine Bluff takes a stab at revitalization; and Helena-West Helena makes an effort to pare down its sprawling city council.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A lawsuit brought on behalf of nearly 150 Mayflower residents impacted by a 2013 pipeline rupture has been settled. Attorneys with three law firms representing the residents confirmed with KUAR they had settled the suit with ExxonMobil, the pipeline operator.

Tyson Foods

Members of Arkansas’s Congressional delegation are safe after a gunman targeted a charity baseball game practice at around 7 a.m. EST Wednesday in Alexandria, Virginia, about 8 miles from the nation’s capitol.

The widely anticipated public testimony from fired former FBI Director James Comey spurs a political response in Arkansas. As Republican U.S. Senator Tom Cotton dines with the president, state Democrats chime in a critique of their across-the-aisle foes’ relationship with the Russia investigations.

Also on the program:

-Applications for Medical Marijuana retail and grow centers are about to roll in. We check in with the soon-to-be state pot industry.

-Neo-Nazis to rally in Batesville; 10 Commandments go up at the Capitol; and will state highways get a boost under ballot measure? A look at some other state political headlines.

-How did Sexism play into the 2016 presidential election. A poll from the University of Arkansas give us an answer.

Questions posed by the lone Arkansan sitting on the Senate Intelligence Committee to former FBI Director James Comey on Thursday produced little information that could be publicly disclosed. Arkansas’s Junior U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton was one of more than a dozen Senators to question Comey, who made his first public appearance since President Donald Trump fired him.

https://blaircenter.uark.edu/the-impact-of-modern-sexism/

Was sexism a factor in the 2016 presidential election? Results of a national poll that surveyed about 3,600 respondents say yes.

The Diane D. Blair Center of Southern Politics and Society at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville conducted the poll shortly after the election. Results came out on Wednesday. KUAR’s Chris Hickey spoke with the poll director, Angie Maxwell, a professor of political science at the U of A.  Poll participants were rated on a commonly used psychological research tool called the Modern Sexism Scale, developed in 1995.

On this week's podcast: As questions about possible collusion between the Donald J. Trump White House and the Russian government swell to a fever pitch in Washington, we talk Arkansas’s congressional reaction to the firing of the FBI director, the appointment of a special prosecutor and more.

-A look toward the 2018 general election. Gov. Asa Hutchinson and other incumbents are in a strong position. What are the big issues? What challenges lie ahead? Who will emerge as the potential challengers?

-And we look at the economic impact of spring flooding on Arkansas farmland.

ualr.edu

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock has named a new provost. Dr. Velmer S. Burton Jr. was named to the position on Friday. Burton recently served as the dean of the University of Mississippi’s School of Applied Sciences. He holds a doctorate in Sociology from the University of Cincinnati and a doctorate in Higher Education Management from the University of Pennsylvania.

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