Chris Hickey

Reporter / Anchor

Chris Hickey was born and raised in Houston, Texas, spending his teenage years in Camden, Ohio. He graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, majoring in English. He got his start in public radio working as a board operator at WMUB in Oxford, Ohio during his summer and winter breaks from school. Since graduating, he has made Little Rock home. He joined KUAR in September 2011 as a production intern and has since enjoyed producing, anchoring and reporting for the station. He is the composer of KUAR's Week-In-Review Podcast theme music and the associate producer of Arts & Letters

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The Arkansas Attorney General’s office and local law enforcement agencies are initiating a program to combat metal in the state. The AG office’s Special Investigations Division will train local law enforcement in online reporting tools and collaborate to inspect scrap yards.

Many metal thefts occur at farms around the state. Randy Veach, Director of the Arkansas Farm Bureau said reporting the thefts are important.  Irrigation equipment and poultry houses are often stripped of metal, he said.

U.S. Rep. Bruce Westerman (4th District) speaking in 2013 at the Arkansas Capitol when he was a State Rep.
Nathan Vandiver / KUAR

Republican Congressman Bruce Westerman's first piece of major legislation is to go up for a final vote Thursday in the U.S. House of Representatives.

KUAR's Chris Hickey has a look at what the Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2015 would do and why it came about.

Westerman has a background in forestry, having received a Master's Degree in the subject from Yale University. So it goes that Westerman turned his Congressional attention to a bill affecting management of forests on federal land.

KUAR Week-In-Review Podcast
Michael Hibblen

KUAR's news staff reviews the week a little early, in advance of the extended 4th of July holiday weekend.

Lethal injection gets a second life in Arkansas, a pair of Purple Hearts for victims of an act of terrorism on Arkansas soil, counties start to tally the number of marriage licenses issued to same-sex couples, Little Rock's long-time performance hall makes it to a renovation checkpoint on time, a hiccup in the governor's plans for Common Core, and Confederate flags get unfurled for the 4th of July.

Nearly a week after the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling that states must recognize and issue same-sex marriage licenses, most Arkansas county clerks are complying. KUAR conducted a brief survey of clerks offices on the number of same-sex or gender-neutral licenses issued in the state's 10 most populous counties.

Chris Hickey / KUAR News

Two U.S. Army privates who were attacked outside of a Little Rock recruiting center in 2009 were awarded with Purple Hearts Wednesday. Military personnel, members of Arkansas's congressional delegation, families and other dignitaries gathered in the State Capitol Rotunda to honor them.

KUAR Week-In-Review Podcast
Michael Hibblen

Two major rulings this week by the U.S. Supreme Court dominate the discussion on KUAR's Week-In-Review podcast this week. 

On Thursday, the court let stand a major provision of the Affordable Care Act, saying federal subsidies can go to states like Arkansas which did not set up state-run exchanges, but instead partner with a federal exchange. The news staff discusses the ruling and has reaction from state legislatures.

same-sex marriage 6-26-15
Sarah Whites-Koditschek / KUAR News

Same-sex couples are getting married in Arkansas after the U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark ruling Friday that state same-sex  marriage bans are unconstitutional. 

The 5-to-4 decision has LGBT people in Arkansas rejoicing and state conservative groups lambasting the decision.

supreme court healthcare
NPR / Alex Wong/Getty Images

Thursday's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that subsidies for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, are legal means that in Arkansas, nearly 70,000 Arkansans will continue to receive assistance. 

Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson is defending a star on the Arkansas Flag representing the state's role in the Confederacy during the American Civil War. Calls to remove official confederate symbolism in southern states have grown louder after a white supremacist who regularly displayed the flag killed nine members of an African American church in Charleston, South Carolina.

KUAR Week-In-Review Podcast
Michael Hibblen

Leading the program this week, the news staff talks about anticipation of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act and implications for Arkansas. 

Several stories about the state's prisons also made news this week. A report said the prison population is growing faster than any other state in the nation, an opinion from the Arkansas Supreme Court means many inmates sentenced to life for crimes committed as juveniles may need to be re-sentenced and efforts to address mental health and sexual assault behind bars.