Chris Hickey

Reporter / Anchor

Chris Hickey was born and raised in Houston, Texas, spending his teenage years in Camden, Ohio. He graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, majoring in English. He got his start in public radio working as a board operator at WMUB in Oxford, Ohio during his summer and winter breaks from school. Since graduating, he has made Little Rock home. He joined KUAR in September 2011 as a production intern and has since enjoyed producing, anchoring and reporting for the station. He is the composer of KUAR's Week-In-Review Podcast theme music and the associate producer of Arts & Letters

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One of three Legislature-sponsored ballot issues this election is a proposed constitutional amendment “concerning the terms, election and eligibility of elected officials.”

UALR sign
Chris Hickey / KUAR News

Top administrators at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock say the campus is due for “across the board” budget cuts of two percent for the remainder of the 2016-17 school year. 

In an email sent to faculty and staff late Wednesday, Chancellor Andrew Rogerson and Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration Steve McClellan said the cuts were necessary to cover “necessary expenses.” They noted that UALR has incurred a drop in revenue this year due to a decline in enrollment. The email did not indicate what the latest enrollment figures were.

File photo. Construction of Big River Steel plant in Mississippi County.
bigriversteel.com

In addition to a citizen-driven ballot question on Medical Marijuana, Arkansas voters are getting to decide on three legislature-sponsored constitutional amendments in this election. One of those, Issue 3, would primarily allow the Arkansas Legislature to approve an unlimited amount of bond money to support new large-scale economic development projects. 

On the podcast this week:

-Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump face off in the final presidential debate this year. Trump says he won’t commit to accepting election results if he loses. What’s the Arkansas response?

-The state unemployment rate ticks up in September. Meanwhile Gov. Hutchinson tours China to talk trade and bring home some jobs.

-Arguments for and against Medical Marijuana ratchet up. We’ll talk TV ads, law enforcement and tax revenue ahead of the November 8th election.

Early voting begins Monday, October 24th. 

http://arkansashumanitiescouncil.org/

This week marks the 25th anniversary of the closing of the Arkansas Gazette, once the oldest newspaper west of the Mississippi. In 1957, as nine black students integrated Little Rock’s Central High School, the paper’s editorial stance in support of integration led it to win two Pulitzer Prizes. 

On this week's podcast, a look at Arkansas political candidates discussing Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, Arkansas Supreme Court rulings removing a couple of proposed constitutional amendments from consideration in next month's election, and the demolition of the Broadway Bridge not going quite as expected.

You can listen to the podcast above or Subscribe on iTunes.

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families and the Arkansas Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics released  joint statement Wednesday opposing two statewide ballot measures to legalize medical marijuana.  In a press release, the organizations gave the following reasons for the opposition:

There are currently no published studies on the efficacy of the marijuana plant as a medication in children.

-Two vice-presidential candidates exchange verbal punches in their first and only debate. Meanwhile, Arkansas’s Junior US Senator Tom Cotton visits Iow. 2020 on the mind?

-A man dies in a Texarkana jail. A newly released video shows a struggle with guards and pleas of “I can’t breathe.”

-Oil and Gas Industry representatives mingle with Arkansas politicians in Little Rock. From whence doth the energy flow?

-An invasive beetle further endangers Ash trees in Arkansas.

- And a celebrated east Arkansas Blues Festival kicks off.

Asa Hutchinson
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The Arkansas Public Service Commission met Tuesday to consider changes to regulations on the process by which homeowners with solar panels or windmills can sell electricity back to utilities.

Two associations representing the oil and gas industries are holding a joint meeting in Little Rock this week.

Members of the Arkansas Independent Producers and Royalty Owners, or AIPRO, are meeting with the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, which describes itself as a “multi-state agency.” The meeting takes place staring Sunday Oct. 2nd  and will end Tuesday Oct. 3rd.

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