Jacob Kauffman

Reporter / Anchor

Jacob Kauffman is a reporter and anchor for KUAR. He primarily covers the state legislature and politics beat while juggling anchoring Morning Edition Monday through Friday. 

Jacob is a long-time Little Rock resident who started out working with Hendrix College's KHDX and the Arkansas Legislative Digest. His work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered, our other wonderful public radio stations across Arkansas, PBS News Hour, BBC Radio, TalkBusiness.net, Arkansas Money & Politics Magazine, ArkansasBlog.com, and the Nashville News. 

He regularly appears on Arkansas Educational Television Network's (AETN) weekly roundtable politics program Arkansas Week. Jacob also served on the board of the MacArthur Military History Museum. If you see him you should ask him about the experience of German-Arkansans during World War I.

Phone: 501-683-7393

Ways to Connect

Central Arkansas Congressman French Hill is holding his first town hall meeting since President Donald Trump took office at a west Little Rock hotel during the workday next Monday. U.S. Senator Tom Cotton will join him.

The state's junior Senator has participated in several town hall style public meetings, some with other Arkansas congressman, replete with hundreds of upset constituents. The event Monday will be Sen. Cotton's first town hall in central Arkansas.

Arkansas-born, best selling author John Grisham penned an editorial in USA Today calling for a stop to Arkansas’s plan to kill eight death row inmates from April 17th to 27th. One inmate has a stay on his sentence. 

A federal judge temporarily blocks the execution of one man who’s among eight to die over a 10-day timetable this month. What does the state’s clemency process have to do with it?

-While a federal appeals court says Ohio can’t use a controversial lethal injection drug, we explore the issues surrounding midazolam—part of Arkansas’s three-drug cocktail.

-What’s Arkansas’s congressional response to President Trump ordering airstrikes against Syria’s Assad regime?

File photo: US Sen. Tom Cotton touring military vehicle prototypes in Little Rock.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR News

Arkansas’s all-Republican congressional delegation is showing support for President Trump’s air strikes in Syria. 

U.S. Senator Tom Cotton, in a statement released late Thursday night, said he commends the president for “taking swift, decisive action” against an “outlaw regime.”

The state's senior U.S. Senator John Boozman said "Limited, swift and decisive action was required to deter further brutality."

Boozman also cautioned against further military action from the executive branch.

Outside the Arkansas House chamber in the state Capitol building.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

A beleaguered bid in the Arkansas Legislature to collect sales taxes from online purchases from companies without a physical presence in the state narrowly failed in the House on Monday. Representative Dan Douglas, a Republican from Bentonville, said it didn’t make sense to collect a tax on his blue jeans at a local store but not when he bought them online.

“They’re the same brand of blue jeans, the same style, the same size, used on the same fat body for the same purpose and they didn’t collect sales tax,” said Douglas. “Now is that fair?”

This edition of KUAR's Week In Review podcast tackles the winding down of the legislative session. Lawmakers retread the concealed carry debate and carve out an exception for athletic events, UAMS, and the state hospital despite NRA opposition. The online sales tax finally gets past a committee hurdle and the bathroom bill gets pushed aside for another time as does highway funding.

A report released on Thursday by one of the nation’s top law schools concludes the state of Arkansas has ignored the mental states and legal representation of eight death row inmates scheduled to die next month. It’s the latest wrinkle in the state’s drive to kill eight inmates in 10 days.

State Rep. Dan Douglas (R-Bentonville).
Arkansas Times/Brian Chilson

A proposal for Arkansas to start collecting sales taxes from online retailers – like nearly every other state does – appears to be dead. A bill fell short in the House Revenue and Taxation Committee on Tuesday. It’s the third time this legislation session the measure has failed to advance.

Arkansans on death row have filed a lawsuit arguing the state’s 10-day timetable to execute eight inmates, with a controversial drug, amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. The motion for a preliminary injunction, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas, asks for a stay in executions until the lawsuit is resolved.

On the program:

-Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson signs a law to eventually bring concealed firearms into college campuses, the state capitol, stadiums and bars. How will the state adapt and who’s raising alarm?

-The Governor also puts pen to paper on a law officially separating Robert E. Lee and Martin Luther King.

-As planned executions for eight state inmates over ten days draws closer, we look at failed efforts to outlaw or limit capital punishment in Arkansas.

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