Steve Inskeep

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with an archaeological find. People working in sand dunes in Northern California found the sphinx. It's made of plaster, weighs 300 pounds and looks like the sphinx in Egypt. Instead of thousands of years old, it's 90.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., is moving close to victory. After a frustrating year in which Republicans who control Congress failed to repeal or replace the Affordable Care Act, Congress is moving closer to approving its first major legislation of 2017.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Another big name in the media industry is going off the air for the time being.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "CHARLIE ROSE")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: From our studios in New York City, this is Charlie Rose.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Tucked into a small side street in the Changping District just north of Beijing, a school stands out in bright, childlike colors — orange and green. Cheerful music plays between classes as students stream into the courtyard to play.

There was a time in China when the solid steel-framed bicycle was the perfect representation of its pace of life. A man in a black cap pedaling down a market street, bearing fruits and vegetables in his front wire basket — that was the full expression of Chinese commerce.

But that has long since changed. Bicycles began disappearing from Beijing and other cities two decades ago, replaced by cars as China's fortunes rose. There are now 6 million cars on Beijing's streets alone; last year, some 28 million cars were sold across China.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Our MORNING EDITION co-host Steve Inskeep has been reporting from China. And he encountered a business so old it's new.

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In China's coal country, Shanxi Province, the black stuff is a more than just a source of income — it is a source of identity. Lumps of it are for sale at the national coal museum, in elegant, satin-lined gift boxes. The rest of the coal museum is faded and out of date, much like the city of Taiyuan, where it is located, about 300 miles southwest of Beijing.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

So this is a question that people have been asking for weeks now - a very long time. We know that the nation's opioid crisis is deadly serious, but is it officially a national emergency or not?

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