Mac Daddies

Sep 29, 2017

Contestants face off in a music parody challenge that combines two of the biggest icons of the 1970s: Fleetwood Mac and macramé. We rewrote Fleetwood Mac songs to be about things with "mac" in their names.

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(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

JONATHAN COULTON: This is NPR's ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm Jonathan Coulton here with puzzle guru Greg Pliska. Now here's your host, Ophira Eisenberg.

(APPLAUSE)

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Thank you, Jonathan. Before the break, we met our contestants Heather and John. Soon, Jonathan Coulton will sing about things with Mac in their name. Is Jonathan a Mac or a PC? Turns out, he's a human being - OK? - with thoughts and some emotions.

COULTON: Thank you, Ophira.

EISENBERG: But first, let's check in with our contestants. Heather, why do you write YA novels?

HEATHER STRICKLAND: Because I think it's really hard for adults to develop a love of reading. But for teenagers, you can kind of trick them into thinking reading is cool and you can develop a love of reading at that age so...

EISENBERG: OK, right. So what kind of themes in YA novels are you particularly into?

STRICKLAND: I tend to write novels about teenagers who fall in love, but then it doesn't work out in the end.

(LAUGHTER)

STRICKLAND: I really like to, like, suck that hope of love out of teenagers...

EISENBERG: Yeah.

STRICKLAND: ...At an early age.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Good, yeah. Disappointment, get that in your head.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I like it. John, you say you use podcasts and graphic novels to trick kids into learning. So what podcast or graphic novel has been particularly helpful?

JOHN DELAMAR-KANTER: Shakespeare's really tough for them. So we use Shakespearian graphic novels 'cause they like pictures, and they think it's really cool to read Shakespeare when they see, like, Macbeth's head actually cut off.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Why imagine it when you can see it beautifully illustrated?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So rumor is our next game is about Fleetwood Mac. And guess what? The rumor is true. We've got a music parody for you called "Mac Daddies."

COULTON: We rewrote Fleetwood Mac songs to make them about people and things with Mac in them, like Macintosh or Seth MacFarlane. So ring in and tell me the Mac that I'm singing about. And if you're right, you can earn a bonus point by giving me the name of the original Fleetwood Mac song that I'm parodying.

EISENBERG: John, you won the last game, so you win this and you are in the final round. Heather, you need to win this or you have to direct the next "Star Wars" movie.

COULTON: You'll get paid a lot of money, and you'll become very famous.

(LAUGHTER)

STRICKLAND: I kind of want to lose now just on purpose.

COULTON: Here we go. (Singing) Eating you isn't the right thing to do. Got three buns, sesame seeds on just one. Even though I could choose nuggets instead, can't resist. Your sauce is special like you.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Heather.

STRICKLAND: Is that a Big Mac?

COULTON: It is a Big Mac. That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Heather, for a bonus point, can you name the song?

STRICKLAND: No, I cannot.

COULTON: That was "Go Your Own Way."

STRICKLAND: Oh, I knew I recognized it.

COULTON: Well, we're going to have to agree to disagree on that one.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: All right, here's your next one. (Singing) Three witches said I would be king. The wife insisted I take a swing. So I murdered King Duncan. It's been downhill from there. Now the Scottish placed a thing.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: John.

DELAMAR-KANTER: That would be "Macbeth."

COULTON: Correct, "Macbeth." That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: For a bonus point, can you name the song?

DELAMAR-KANTER: "Landslide."

COULTON: "Landslide," that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Here we go. (Singing) "Maltese Falcon" had a face for which they homicided (ph). "Pulp Fiction" had that mysterious case, but who knows what's inside it. It's a movie plot device that propels heroes on their trip. It's a term invented by Hitchcock. It's the holy grail.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Heather.

STRICKLAND: MacGuffin.

COULTON: MacGuffin. You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Heather, for a bonus point, can you name the song?

STRICKLAND: No. I already forgot what the song sounded like.

COULTON: Yeah. No, me too.

STRICKLAND: No, I cannot name the song.

COULTON: That was "Rhiannon."

STRICKLAND: Oh, yeah.

COULTON: Yeah, sure was.

STRICKLAND: You're right, it was. Yeah.

COULTON: (Singing) Agent Cooper's back right now. And though 25 years have gone by, I can still hear him saying damn fine coffee, cherry pie.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: John.

DELAMAR-KANTER: Kyle MacLachlan.

COULTON: Kyle MacLachlan is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Can you name the original Fleetwood Mac song?

DELAMAR-KANTER: "The Chain?"

COULTON: "The Chain," that's right.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

COULTON: OK, this is your last clue. (Singing) I knew you'd bring a souvenir for me from Hawaii. Maybe a snow globe with Tiki huts. It could have been a hula skirt or a ukulele. But it's just this dumb can of nuts.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Heather.

STRICKLAND: (Laughter) It's a Macadamia nuts.

COULTON: It is Macadamia, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: For a bonus point, can you name the Fleetwood Mac song I was singing?

STRICKLAND: No. Apparently, I really don't know Fleetwood Mac. I cannot.

COULTON: You should check them out. They're a great band.

STRICKLAND: Yeah.

COULTON: That was "You Making Loving Fun." Greg Pliska, how did the contestants do?

GREG PLISKA: Well, it was another close match, but, John, you have won. And you will be going on to our final round.

(APPLAUSE) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.