The Puzzle And The Pea

Sep 14, 2014
Originally published on September 14, 2014 10:56 am

On-air challenge: Every answer today is a word or name with an accented syllable "pee" — spelled in any way — but always occurring inside the word, never at the start or end. For example, one saying the same thing again and again would be "repeater."

Last week's challenge: Think of a word starting with T. Drop the T, and phonetically you'll get a new word that's a synonym of the first one. What words are these?

Answer: Twirl / whirl

Winner: Brian Gillis of Evanston, Ill.

Next week's challenge: This three-part challenge comes from listener Lou Gottlieb. If you punch 0-1-4-0 into a calculator, and turn it upside-down, you get the state OHIO. What numbers can you punch in a calculator, and turn upside-down, to get a state capital, a country and a country's capital?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Get yourself a cup of coffee or tea, settle down with your paper and pen, and put away that newspaper just for a few minutes 'cause it's time to play the puzzle.

Joining me now, the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Good morning, Will. So good to talk to you again.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lynn. How are you?

NEARY: I'm very well. Thank you. So tell us, what was last week's challenge, Will?

SHORTZ: Yes. I said think of a word starting with T as in Thomas, drop the T, and phonetically you'll get a new word that's a synonym of the first one. What word are these?

NEARY: And the answer?

SHORTZ: Well, the answer is twirl, making whirl. And we also got another answer. I think it was facetious, twerk to work.

NEARY: (Laughter). As I recall, I thought this was a hard puzzle. I said I don't think I would ever get this. And I must not be the only one who felt that way because we only got 270 entries. And the correct answer came from Brian Gillis. And we have reached him in the Adirondacks in New York State. Hi, Brian.

BRIAN GILLIS: Hi, Lynn. How are you?

NEARY: I'm very well, but I'm very jealous of you because I love the Adirondacks. They're so beautiful. What are you doing there?

GILLIS: I'm here with my husband. We're both academics. And we're kind of on a writing retreat. And we got married up here so we decided to come back and try to make it a work space too.

NEARY: Where do you usually live?

GILLIS: Well, I'm a graduate student at UC Berkeley. I'm finishing my dissertation in California, but we're primarily based in Evanston, Illinois rights now.

NEARY: OK so you have a busy life. So why don't you say hi to Will before we start playing.

GILLIS: Hi, Will. How are you?

SHORTZ: Hi, there. Real good and congratulations.

NEARY: Do you like to play puzzles a lot?

GILLIS: I do. In fact, I've been on Ask Me Another. And I happened to meet Will last summer in Central Park when the Ask Me Another game show came there.

NEARY: Do you remember that, Will?

SHORTZ: I do. That was a great time.

NEARY: Great. So it sounds like you're quite a pro at these puzzles. Are you ready to play a new one?

GILLIS: I wouldn't call myself a pro. But I'd love it if we could play together, Lynn.

NEARY: OK, take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right, Brian and Lynn, every answer today is a word or name with the accented syllable P spelled in any way, but always occurring inside the word, never at the start or end. For example, if I said one saying the same thing again and again, you would say repeater. So it's always got P somewhere in the middle. And you're first one is capital of Kansas.

GILLIS: The capital of Kansas is Topeka.

SHORTZ: That's it. Underwater missile.

GILLIS: An underwater missile. An underwater missile

SHORTZ: Like a battle ship.

GILLIS: Torpedo.

SHORTZ: A torpedo is right. Britannica or World Book.

GILLIS: An encyclopedia.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Any word like chirp or moo.

GILLIS: Chirp or moo.

NEARY: I can't think of it.

SHORTZ: And specifically, oh, you know, I bet you know this, Lynn. It's any word that sounds like the sound that an animal would make.

GILLIS: Oh, onomatopoeia.

SHORTZ: Onomatopoeia is it. A person for Manila.

GILLIS: A person from Manila you said?

SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

GILLIS: A Filipino.

SHORTZ: Filipino. From France or Germany for example.

GILLIS: France or Germany, for example, is a European.

SHORTZ: Right. An Italian way to cook veal or chicken.

GILLIS: Scaloppine.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Calgary's professional football team.

GILLIS: Oh, gosh. Calgary's professional football team. Oh, this is so out of my wheel house Will.

>>SHORTZ And here's an additional hint. People who set off a herd of Buffalo running. What would they be?

GILLIS: The Stampeders.

SHORTZ: Stampeders is it. Calgary Stampeders.

GILLIS: OK.

NEARY: Oh, I never knew that.

SHORTZ: How about a fancy term for baldness.

GILLIS: A fancy term for baldness, alopecia.

SHORTZ: That's it. A popular travel website.

GILLIS: Expedia.

SHORTZ: Expedia. And your last one a demand to appear in court.

GILLIS: A demand to appear in court is not a summons but...

NEARY: Oh, I know.

GILLIS: Go for it, Lynn.

NEARY: OK, wait. It begins with S. It also begins with S.

SHORTZ: Yes.

GILLIS: An S. Not a summons, but a...

SHORTZ: And this is my favorite because the P sound is spelled in such a bizarre way.

GILLIS: Oh, a subpoena, of course.

SHORTZ: Subpoena, that's it.

GILLIS: Right.

SHORTZ: Nice job.

NEARY: But I have to say that was a hard-one - alopecia and the Stampeders, Will?

(LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: You never know where the puzzle's going to take you.

NEARY: Well, Brian, I think you did great. And I hope you had fun.

GILLIS: Well, thanks so much. I certainly did.

NEARY: And of course, for playing the puzzle today, you will get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin. You'll get puzzle books and games. And to find out more about these prizes, go to npr.org/puzzle. So, Brian, what public radio station do you listen to?

GILLIS: We listen to WBEZ in Chicago and KQED in San Francisco.

NEARY: Oh, two great stations. Brian Gillis of Evanston, Illinois, thanks so much for planning the puzzle and have a great time in the Adirondacks.

GILLIS: Thanks so much, Lynn. And thanks a lot, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you.

NEARY: So, Will, we're ready to hear next week's challenge now.

SHORTZ: Yes. It is a three-parter and it comes from listener Lou Gottlieb. If you punch 0-1-4-0 into a calculator and turn it upside down, you get the state Ohio. What numbers can you punch in a calculator and turn upside down to get a state capital, a country and a country's capital. So again 0-1-4-0, punch it into a calculator, turn it upside down, you get Ohio. What numbers can you punch in a calculator and turn upside down to get a state capital, a country and a country's capital?

NEARY: All right. Well good luck to everyone with that. And when you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle and click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person please. And the deadline for entries is Thursday September 18 at 3 p.m. Eastern time. And don't forget to include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you will get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will. It was fun again.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Lynn. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.