A Puzzle Cheer: Give Me An 'A'!

Sep 28, 2014
Originally published on September 28, 2014 2:55 pm

On-air challenge: There are clues for two words. Add a long A sound at the end of the first word to phonetically get the second one. For example, the clues "baby cow" and "sidewalk eatery" would yield "calf" and "cafe."

Last week's challenge: Name a famous actor best known for tough-guy roles. The first five letters of his first name and the first four letters of his last name are the first five and four letters, respectively, in the first and last names of a famous author. Who is the actor, and who is the author?

Answer: Charles Bronson / Charlotte Bronte

Winner: Jason Sclar of Somerville, Mass.

Next week's challenge: This challenge comes from listener Henry Hook, who creates crosswords for the Sunday Boston Globe and many other publications. Think of a 10-letter word that names an invention of the early 20th century and includes an A and an O. Remove the A. Then move the O to where the A was, leaving a space where the O was, and you'll name a much more recent invention. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Put those thinking caps on because you know what time it is. It's time for the puzzle. Here now is the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Linda.

WERTHEIMER: Now could you please remind us about last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. I said name a famous actor best known for tough-guy roles. I said the first five letters of his first name and the first four letters of his last name are the first five and four letters respectively in the first and last names of a famous author. Who's the actor, and who's the author?

WERTHEIMER: Oh, my goodness. And who are they?

SHORTZ: Well, the tough-guy actor is Charles Bronson. And take those letters, you get Charlotte Bronte.

WERTHEIMER: Now there's a couple.

SHORTZ: There is a couple.

WERTHEIMER: We received almost 1,100 correct entries. And Jason Sclar from Somerville, Massachusetts sent us the right answer. Jason, congratulations.

JASON SCLAR: Thank you, Linda

WERTHEIMER: So how did you think of Charles Bronson and Charlotte Bronte?

SCLAR: When I hear movie tough guys, Charles Bronson's the first name I think of. And I wrote it down. And then I erased the end of it, and it looked like Charlotte Bronte.

WERTHEIMER: There you go. Well, that's great. So what do you do in Somerville?

SCLAR: I'm a graduate student.

WERTHEIMER: A graduate student at...

SCLAR: At Harvard in political science.

WERTHEIMER: OK. Well, let me bring in Will. Will, meet Jason.

SHORTZ: Hey there. Congratulations.

SCLAR: Thank you.

WERTHEIMER: Will, are we ready to play?

SHORTZ: I'm ready to play. Let's see. Jason and Linda, I'm going to give you clues for two words. Add a long A sound at the end of the first word to phonetically get the second. For example, if I said a baby cow and a sidewalk eatery, you would say calf and cafe. OK?

SCLAR: OK.

SHORTZ: Number one is a frogs sound and the lawn game.

SCLAR: Croak and crochet?

SHORTZ: That's it. Number two is added up and not now, but eventually.

WERTHEIMER: Added up.

SHORTZ: What word means added up? Made an addition.

SCLAR: Summed.

SHORTZ: Yeah. Yeah. Summed and now put an A sound at the end.

SCLAR: Summed and someday.

SHORTZ: Summed and someday is it. Good. Here you go. TV's Dr. Blank and a strip of boneless fish.

SCLAR: Dr. Phil and fillet.

SHORTZ: That's it. Variety and the Capitol of Taiwan.

SCLAR: Type and Taipei.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Hockey feint and rot.

SCLAR: Deke and decay.

SHORTZ: I thought you'd get that. Quartette and raid.

SCLAR: It's four...

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Yes.

WERTHEIMER: Keep going.

SCLAR: And foray.

SHORTZ: Foray, yes. F-O-R-A-Y. Good. Start of a tennis rally and an opinion poll.

SCLAR: Serve and survey.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Searched for and to cook in a small amount of fat.

SCLAR: Sought and saute.

SHORTZ: Green area within a city and a floor made of many pieces of wood.

SCLAR: Park and parquet.

WERTHEIMER: That's a funny one.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Thank you. A creamy soup and Spain and France's Bay of blank.

SCLAR: Is that bisque and Biscay?

SHORTZ: That's it. A sturdy tree and to approve.

SCLAR: Oak and OK.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. Prepared as onion rings and end of the workweek.

SCLAR: Fried and Friday.

SHORTZ: That's it. And your last one is a feminine pronoun and a cry of joy or victory.

SCLAR: Her and hooray.

SHORTZ: There you go.

WERTHEIMER: Jason, that was a great job.

SCLAR: Thank you.

WERTHEIMER: And for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, puzzle books, game. And you can find out more about these prizes at npr.org/puzzle. Jason, what public radio do you listen to?

SCLAR: WBUR.

WERTHEIMER: Jason Sclar of Somerville, Massachusetts, thank you very much for playing the puzzle with us.

SCLAR: Thanks for having me.

WERTHEIMER: So, Will, what is the new challenge you have?

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from listener Henry Hook who creates crossroads for the Sunday Boston Globe and many other publications. Think of a 10-letter word that names an invention of the early 20th century and it includes an A and an O. Remove the A, then move the O to where the O was leaving a space where the O was, and you'll name a much more recent invention. What is it? So again, a 10-letter word that names an invention of the early 20th century. It includes an A and an O. Drop the A, move the O to where to A was and leave a space where the O was, and you will name a much more recent invention. What is it?

WERTHEIMER: I have no idea. But when you get the answer, you can go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person please. And our deadline for entries is Thursday October 2 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we will give you a call and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and the WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Thanks, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Linda. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.