Sen. Cotton Says Obama Floundering In Face Of Terror

Apr 17, 2016

U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) delivers the Republican address for Saturday, April 16.
Credit src.senate.gov

Arkansas’s Junior U.S. Senator Tom Cotton was tapped by his party leadership to deliver the Republican Address this weekend. In it, Cotton touched on themes common to his tenure in the Senate—mostly criticizing the President Barack Obama’s administration for not being sufficiently tough on terrorists like the Islamic State, or ISIL, and the theocratic regime of Iran.

Cotton said Americans are understandably fearful of terrorists in the wake of the March 22 Brussels, Belgium bombings.

“But President Obama wants us to chill out,” said Cotton. “He believes overreaction to terrorism is a greater threat than terrorism itself. He minimizes the threat of terror attacks, even as these savages cut off the heads of Americans and inspire or direct radicals to blow themselves up in public places.”

Cotton also criticized the Obama Administration’s deal with Iran, which was intended to curb that country’s nuclear capabilities.

“The president’s deal gave the world’s worst state sponsor of terrorism access to more than $100 billion, 24 days notice for inspections and a vast nuclear program that Iran can easily use to build a nuclear weapon. In return, the Ayatollahs gave us the proverbial sleeves off their vest,” Cotton said.

You can listen or watch Cotton's full remarks here.

Obama has argued that stopping terrorism does partly rely on Americans rejecting  propaganda of terrorists and refusing to “stigmatize Muslim-Americans.”

In an address given for the week of March 26, the President outlined his administration’s response to the Brussels attack.

“We’re …working to disrupt plots against the United States and against our friends and allies.  A team of FBI agents is on the ground in Belgium supporting the investigation.  We’ve ramped up our intelligence cooperation so that we can root out ISIL’s operations.  And we constantly review our homeland security posture to remain vigilant against any efforts to target the United States.”

In a July 18, 2015 address shortly following the Iranian nuclear deal negotiated between the Islamic Republic, the United States and several world powers, Obama defended the policy thusly:

“Does this deal resolve all of the threats Iran poses to its neighbors and the world?  No.  Does it do more than anyone has done before to make sure Iran does not obtain a nuclear weapon?  Yes.  And that was our top priority from the start.  That’s why it’s in everyone’s best interest to make sure this deal holds.  Because without this deal, there would be no limits on Iran’s nuclear program.  There would be no monitoring, no inspections.  The sanctions we rallied the world to impose would unravel.  Iran could move closer to a nuclear weapon.  Other countries in the region might race to do the same.  And we’d risk another war in the most volatile region in the world.  That’s what would happen without this deal.”

It was the third time Sen. Cotton had delivered the Weekly Republican address. He delivered an address twice in 2014 when he was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.