Arkansas Moments

Arkansas Moments is a special feature of UA Little Rock's Public Radio that explores the history of the civil rights movement in Arkansas with Dr. John A. Kirk, George W. Donaghey Distinguished Professor of History and director of UA Little Rock's Anderson Institute on Race and Ethnicity.

jakirk@ualr.edu

Miles Davis

Jan 31, 2017

The Arkansas delta’s rich musical and cultural heritage is often overshadowed by the Mississippi delta. Yet as Jimmy Cunningham Jr. and Donna Cunningham note in their book Delta Music and Film: Jefferson County and the Lowlands, published by Arcadia, the Arkansas delta has much to be proud of.

Big Bill Broonzy

Jan 31, 2017

The Arkansas delta’s rich musical and cultural heritage is often overshadowed by the Mississippi delta. Yet as Jimmy Cunningham Jr. and Donna Cunningham note in their book Delta Music and Film: Jefferson County and the Lowlands, published by Arcadia, the Arkansas delta has much to be proud of. One of its favorite sons is bluesman “Big Bill” Broonzy.

This year’s honorees on the UA Little Rock Joel E. Anderson Institute on Race and Ethnicity’s award-winning Arkansas Civil Rights Heritage Trail, located in downtown Little Rock, all represent the theme of Economic Advancement:

This year’s honorees on the UALR Joel E. Anderson Institute on Race and Ethnicity’s award-winning Arkansas Civil Rights Heritage Trail, located in downtown Little Rock, all represent the theme of Economic Advancement. One of the honorees is William “Sonny” Walker, head of the Arkansas Office of Economic Opportunity, which coordinated War on Poverty efforts in the state in the 1960s.

This year’s honorees on the UALR Joel E. Anderson Institute on Race and Ethnicity’s award-winning Arkansas Civil Rights Heritage Trail, located in downtown Little Rock, all represent the theme of Economic Advancement. One of the honorees is Robert Lee Hill of the Progressive Farmers and Household Union, which organized in the Arkansas delta to gain fair wages for sharecroppers. You can find out more about this year’s Arkansas Civil Rights Heritage Trail honorees when all the new inductees are announced on Wednesday, February 1, at noon, in the Ron Robinson Theater in downtown Little Rock.

This year’s honorees on the UALR Joel E. Anderson Institute on Race and Ethnicity’s award-winning Arkansas Civil Rights Heritage Trail, located in downtown Little Rock, all represent the theme of Economic Advancement. One of the honorees is William Wallace Andrews, an enslaved person who became a prominent black figure in Little Rock before and after the civil war. You can find out more about this year’s Arkansas Civil Rights Heritage Trail honorees when all the new inductees are announced on Wednesday, February 1, at noon, in the Ron Robinson Theater in downtown Little Rock.

Winthrop Rockefeller on the Confederacy

Oct 7, 2016

Fifty years ago this November [2016], Winthrop Rockefeller was elected Arkansas’s first Republican governor in almost a century. To win the election, Rockefeller beat Arkansas’s leading segregationist Jim Johnson. Black votes were vital in Rockefeller’s victory. Rockefeller later proclaimed: “The old South is dead. This will infuriate the true believers in white supremacy.

Winthrop Rockefeller on White Supremacy

Oct 7, 2016

Fifty years ago this November [2016], Winthrop Rockefeller was elected Arkansas’s first Republican governor in almost a century by beating Arkansas’s leading segregationist Jim Johnson. Rockefeller later explained: “The reckless course of white supremacy at any cost was running out of appeal; it was losing its credibility with the people. That racism could become a political liability in Arkansas, less than ten years after the tragedy that was “Little Rock Central High School,” proposes a fascinating study….And you could sense that major change—historic change—was at hand.

Winthrop Rockefeller on Two-Party Politics

Oct 7, 2016

Fifty years ago this November [2016], Winthrop Rockefeller was elected Arkansas’s first Republican governor in almost a century. He strongly believed that two-party politics was essential to the state’s advancement and to breaking the yoke of white supremacy.

Fifty years ago this November [2016], Winthrop Rockefeller was elected Arkansas’s first Republican governor in almost a century. As governor, Rockefeller helped to improve race relations in a number of ways. A significant development was the appointment of some African Americans to state boards for the first time. The most controversial episode proved to be Rockefeller’s attempt to appoint an African American to the State Board of Education. The Arkansas Senate refused to confirm Rockefeller’s first choice, civil rights attorney John Walker.

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