Here and Now

Mondays-Friday, 1-3 p.m. on KUAR
Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

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NPR Story
2:03 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Veterans Say Suicide Is Their Top Concern

House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller, R-Fla., joined by Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., at right, speaks on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Thursday, July 10, during a news conference on a bill to combat veteran suicides. Miller introduced the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act to combat veteran suicide. (Evan Vucci/AP)

It’s estimated that 22 military veterans commit suicide every day, but if you talk to people who are familiar with this issue, they’ll tell you the real number is probably higher. The latest statistics from the Pentagon show that suicides among active duty military are up slightly, compared to the same period last year. There have been 161 confirmed or suspected suicides so far in 2014. There were 154 by this time last year.

According to the Associated Press, suicides are up among Navy and Air Force personnel. The numbers are down for soldiers and Marines.

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NPR Story
1:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Good Movies You Might Have Missed

The movie "Snowpiecer" opened to critical acclaim a few weeks ago but you might have trouble finding it at a theater near you. (Courtesy)

The movie “Snowpiercer” opened to critical acclaim a few weeks ago, but you might have trouble finding it at a theater near you.

In fact, as Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr has noted, a number of good films have either not been released widely, or disappeared from movie theaters before audiences could discover them.

He shares a few of his recent favorites with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti, including “The Immigrant,” “Fading Gigolo,” “Land Ho!” and “Edge of Tomorrow.”

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NPR Story
1:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

You Might Call This Story Sour Grapes

Wine fraud has existed as long as wine has been made, but Rudy Kurniawan is the first person to be tried and convicted for selling fake wine in the United States. (Alessio Maffeis/Flickr)

It was an elaborate con involving wine and some of America’s wealthiest collectors.

Rudy Kurniawan is the first person to be tried and convicted for selling fake wine in the United States. He manufactured phony vintages in his kitchen and sold more than $35 million worth in 2006 alone.

The BBC’s business correspondent, Michelle Fleury, reports on the case as it moves towards sentencing.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Netherlands Mourns As Crash Victims' Bodies Arrive

A convoy of funeral hearses carrying coffins containing the remains of victims of the downed Malaysia Airlines flight MH17, drives from the Eindhoven Airbase to Hilversum on July 23, 2014. (Jerry Lampen/AFP/Getty Images)

The Dutch Safety Board says it has taken charge of the investigation into the shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Eastern Ukraine. The two black boxes from the airliner are reported to have arrived in Britain.

In the Netherlands, it’s a National Day of Mourning. Church bells in towns and villages across the country rang for five minutes today, just before two transport planes arrived at Eindhoven airbase, carrying the first coffins of the crash victims.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Commonwealth Games Begin

An athlete trains at Hampden Park, venue for the track and field athletics ahead of the Commonwealth Games on July 23, 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland. (Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

Only A Game‘s Doug Tribou is in Scotland for start of the Commonwealth Games, an event that takes place every four years.

About 4,500 athletes from 71 nations and territories will fiercely compete for medals in 17 sports. The competition seeks to unify the Commonwealth countries through sport, and runs through August 3rd.

Tribou joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti with a preview of the games being held in Glasgow.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

New California Football Law Tackles Brain Injuries Head-On

Central Catholic's Reggie Bland (24) in action in a California Interscholastic Federation Division 4 high school football championship game in Carson, Calif., Friday, Dec. 20, 2013. (Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP)

In a few weeks, high school football players across the country will begin training for the season to come. In California, come January 1st, those practices will be different.

Governor Jerry Brown this week signed a new law that limits full-contact drills for all teams in public and private middle and high schools. The legislation comes amid concerns about concussions and brain injuries in football.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Remains Of Clovis Boy Reburied In Montana

During a special ceremony, scientists and representatives of six tribes reburied a 12,600-year-old Clovis child in a patch of sagebrush on Saturday June, 28, 2014, close to the site where he was accidentally unearthed almost 50 years ago. (Shawn Raecke/Livingston Enterprise)

Earlier this year, Here & Now told the story of the so-called “Clovis boy,” a young boy buried in what is now Montana, more than 12,000 years ago. His remains were discovered there in 1968 and eventually his DNA was analyzed, showing the boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America about 13,000 years ago.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Hong Kong Debates Independence From China

A child holds up a banner during a pro-democracy rally seeking greater democracy in Hong Kong on July 1, 2014, as frustration grows over the influence of Beijing on the city. (Dale De La Rey/AFP/Getty)

There have been huge protests in the former British colony Hong Kong recently. Hundreds of thousands took to the streets to demand that Beijing honor China’s commitment to Hong Kong’s political and judicial independence.

As the BBC’s Juliana Liu reports, there is deep anxiety in Hong Kong that China has no intention of allowing people on the island to choose their next leader, but there are also protestors on the other side, with leanings more toward China.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Next iPhone To Offer Bigger Screen, But Will It Fit In Your Pocket?

Apple will manufacture iPhones with larger displays for its next model. (Photo Giddy/Flickr)

Apple is placing its bets on iPhones with bigger screens, and a whole lot of them. The company is asking suppliers to make between 70 and 80 million of the new models with 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch screens by December 30, according to the Wall Street Journal. This is larger than the current models with 4-inch displays.

Apple had stuck with its smaller displays even as rival smartphone companies rolled out bigger screens and customers sought larger models. Now, Apple will join their ranks.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Boxing Attracts More Than Would-Be Fighters

Springs Toledo, right, watches boxers at The Ring Boxing Club. (Emiko Tamagawa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 3:13 pm

Who boxes nowadays? Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson went to The Ring Boxing Club in Boston and found that fighters ranged in age and were of both genders.

He talks to several boxers as well as Springs Toledo, author of “The Gods of War: Boxing Essays” (excerpt below), about the continuing appeal of the sport.

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