Here and Now

Mondays-Thursdays, 1-3 p.m. on KUAR
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews. A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Legendary rock star Levon Helm died in 2012 of throat cancer, but his daughter Amy is carrying the family torch. She still produces the Midnight Rambles, a concert series that her father began, and she’s on the road this summer touring behind her 2015 solo album “Didn’t It Rain.”

Here & Now‘s Robin Young spoke with Amy Helm when her album was released.

Hear our original conversation with Amy Helm from July 2015.

Fifty years ago, nearly everyone who died in the United States was buried in a grave. Today, just about half are cremated. Money is the primary reason.

A typical cremation costs nearly $500 less than a typical burial. And, many people move away from their hometowns, where traditional family plots are located.

Here & Now‘s Kristiina Sorenson reports on the mushroom suit, the latest thing in burial trends.

At age 48, former tech entrepreneur and author James Altucher prides himself on owning just 15 things.

It’s not that he can’t afford more. But after a series of financial failures, and hitting bottom emotionally, he realized the best way to heal was to give away everything. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Altucher living more with less.

Read Altucher’s essay “I Want to Die.”

Yesterday, we looked at a new rail line being constructed in London, a massive project that’s set to be completed on time and under budget.

Today, a look at the challenges of improving and maintaining the New York City subway, operated by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says that whether you serve them hot or cold, soups are a great addition to any summer meal.

She brings Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson a clam and fish chowder and a potato and leek soup that can be served heated or chilled. Kathy also shares a couple of soup recipes that don’t require cooking.

Millions of people each year visit famous battlefields of the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. But far fewer visit locations in the Hawaiian Civil War or the French and Indian War. Earlier this summer, the National Park Service awarded more than $1 million in grants to research and protect lesser-known battlefields, including the 19th century Rogue River War in southern Oregon.

Tom Banse from the Northwest News Network reports.

This story contains sensitive sexual information and may not be suitable for all readers.

Juan Guerrero was scared to get out of prison.

He was serving a six-and-a-half-year sentence in Lawton, Oklahoma, for having sex with an underage teenager.

Now, one of about 800,000 registered sex offenders in the United States, Guerrero faces the challenge of assimilating back into society. He was in his mid-30s and asking some pretty daunting questions: Where would he live? Who would hire him? How would he explain his past to people?

Our Here & Now colleague Karyn Miller-Medzon is part of a group of runners trekking through the Andes Mountains, running to Machu Picchu, the ancient Inca citadel.

The trip supports and organization called Strive, which takes student-athletes to Peru and Kenya, where they work on infrastructure and teaching projects in small communities. They also get to train at altitude, which can benefit their running when they come home. This is the first time Strive has taken a group of adults abroad.

The New York Times is reporting that Paul Manafort, Donald Trump’s campaign manager, received millions in undisclosed cash payments from the pro-Russia political party during his time as a consultant in Ukraine.

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Kurt Andersen, host of WNYC’s Studio 360, about his 2012 novel, “True Believers.”

Its main character struggles with Type 1 diabetes, as does Andersen. He talks about the challenges of dealing with his disease.

Read more and see listener comments from our original interview in 2012.

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