Here and Now

Mondays-Friday, 1-3 p.m. on KUAR
Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Commonwealth Games Begin

An athlete trains at Hampden Park, venue for the track and field athletics ahead of the Commonwealth Games on July 23, 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland. (Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

Only A Game‘s Doug Tribou is in Scotland for start of the Commonwealth Games, an event that takes place every four years.

About 4,500 athletes from 71 nations and territories will fiercely compete for medals in 17 sports. The competition seeks to unify the Commonwealth countries through sport, and runs through August 3rd.

Tribou joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti with a preview of the games being held in Glasgow.

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NPR Story
1:30 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

New California Football Law Tackles Brain Injuries Head-On

Central Catholic's Reggie Bland (24) in action in a California Interscholastic Federation Division 4 high school football championship game in Carson, Calif., Friday, Dec. 20, 2013. (Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP)

In a few weeks, high school football players across the country will begin training for the season to come. In California, come January 1st, those practices will be different.

Governor Jerry Brown this week signed a new law that limits full-contact drills for all teams in public and private middle and high schools. The legislation comes amid concerns about concussions and brain injuries in football.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Remains Of Clovis Boy Reburied In Montana

During a special ceremony, scientists and representatives of six tribes reburied a 12,600-year-old Clovis child in a patch of sagebrush on Saturday June, 28, 2014, close to the site where he was accidentally unearthed almost 50 years ago. (Shawn Raecke/Livingston Enterprise)

Earlier this year, Here & Now told the story of the so-called “Clovis boy,” a young boy buried in what is now Montana, more than 12,000 years ago. His remains were discovered there in 1968 and eventually his DNA was analyzed, showing the boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America about 13,000 years ago.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Hong Kong Debates Independence From China

A child holds up a banner during a pro-democracy rally seeking greater democracy in Hong Kong on July 1, 2014, as frustration grows over the influence of Beijing on the city. (Dale De La Rey/AFP/Getty)

There have been huge protests in the former British colony Hong Kong recently. Hundreds of thousands took to the streets to demand that Beijing honor China’s commitment to Hong Kong’s political and judicial independence.

As the BBC’s Juliana Liu reports, there is deep anxiety in Hong Kong that China has no intention of allowing people on the island to choose their next leader, but there are also protestors on the other side, with leanings more toward China.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Next iPhone To Offer Bigger Screen, But Will It Fit In Your Pocket?

Apple will manufacture iPhones with larger displays for its next model. (Photo Giddy/Flickr)

Apple is placing its bets on iPhones with bigger screens, and a whole lot of them. The company is asking suppliers to make between 70 and 80 million of the new models with 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch screens by December 30, according to the Wall Street Journal. This is larger than the current models with 4-inch displays.

Apple had stuck with its smaller displays even as rival smartphone companies rolled out bigger screens and customers sought larger models. Now, Apple will join their ranks.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Boxing Attracts More Than Would-Be Fighters

Springs Toledo, right, watches boxers at The Ring Boxing Club. (Emiko Tamagawa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 3:13 pm

Who boxes nowadays? Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson went to The Ring Boxing Club in Boston and found that fighters ranged in age and were of both genders.

He talks to several boxers as well as Springs Toledo, author of “The Gods of War: Boxing Essays” (excerpt below), about the continuing appeal of the sport.

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NPR Story
2:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Chinese Buyers Snap Up Real Estate In The U.S.

A sale pending sign is posted in front of a home for sale on July 17, 2014 in San Francisco, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 3:13 pm

Foreign buyers have helped boost luxury real estate prices in places such as Manhattan for several years now. But that trend may soon push into non-luxury markets across the United States.

The real estate website Zillow soon plans to publish its for-sale listings in Mandarin. Diane Francis of the National Post joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss the recent announcement.

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NPR Story
2:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Crash Investigation Expert Weighs In On Flight MH17

Luggage and personal belongings from Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 lie in a field on July 20, 2014 in Grabovo, Ukraine. Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was travelling from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur when it crashed killing all 298 on board including 80 children. The aircraft was allegedly shot down by a missile and investigations continue over the perpetrators of the attack. (Rob Stothard/Getty Images)

There are still many questions and few answers related to the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 that crashed Thursday, killing all 298 passengers aboard. The commercial airliner may have been shot down by a missile along the Russian and Ukraine border.

Jim Hall, former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss the steps that would normally be taken after a plane crash.

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2:20 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Deborah Harkness Brings Her 'All Souls' Trilogy To A Close

Author Deborah Harkness has just released "The Book of Life," the final book in her bestselling "All Souls" trilogy. (Marion Ettlinger)

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 9:39 am

In 2011, University of Southern California history professor Deborah Harkness introduced readers to professor and reluctant witch Diana Bishop and vampire scientist Matthew Clairmont in “A Discovery of Witches.”

It was the first in what has come to be called her “All Souls Trilogy.”

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

District Profile: Environmental Issues Come To A Head In Coal Country

In West Virginia's third congressional district, Republican state senator Evan Jenkins, right, will try to unseat Democratic incumbent Nick Rahall. (U.S. House of Representatives / West Virginia Legislature)

As President Obama announces new actions on climate change, a tight congressional race in southern West Virginia coal country is bringing environmental issues to the forefront.

In West Virginia’s third congressional district, Evan Jenkins, a Republican state senator, will try to unseat Democratic incumbent Nick Rahall, who’s been in office since 1977.

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