Here and Now

Mondays-Thursdays, 1-3 p.m. on KUAR
Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a5f3e1c83d86eb2ec3ff|5182a5e3e1c83d86eb2ec3b9

Pages

NPR Story
2:29 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

To Publish Or Not To Publish? Media Wrestles With Charlie Hebdo Covers

A person reads the latest issue of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the offices of the weekly in Paris, killing 12. (Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images)

Twelve people were murdered in Paris on Wednesday at the offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, apparently over offensive cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad.

In the days since, media outlets around the country and the world have struggled with whether or not to display the publication’s cartoons in their own pages, websites and television broadcasts.

Read more
NPR Story
2:05 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Boston Celebrates Its Olympic Bid

Governor of Massachusetts Charlie Baker addresses the media as Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh, right, looks on, during a press conference to announce Boston as the U.S. applicant city to host the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center on January 9 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 6:54 am

Last night, the U.S. Olympic Committee tabbed Boston as the American city that will bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics. City officials and representatives from Boston2024, the organization that backed the bid, discussed next steps during a press conference this morning.

Read more
NPR Story
2:05 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Made In The USA: Military Looking For Domestically-Made Athletic Shoes

U.S. Army soldiers run down Ardennes Street during pre-dawn physical training November 14, 2002 in Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. Ardennes Street has probably seen the footfall of millions of soldiers over the past decades, as the main area for the mandatory PT every morning on Ft. Bragg. Soon, soldiers could be running in military-issued domestically made sneakers rather than purchasing theirs through a stipend, as they do now. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

Athletic shoe companies are clamoring to become the first official training shoe of the U.S. military.

In the 1940s, a law was created requiring that all components of the U.S. military uniform be made domestically, but there was a catch. Training shoes were not included in the requirement because, at the time, they were not produced domestically. But now, companies like Saucony, New Balance and Adidas are vying for the spot.

Read more
NPR Story
2:05 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

Assessing The Legacy Of The London Olympics

Cyclists ride the BMX track at the Lee Valley Velopark, formerly the cycling venue for the London 2012 Olympic Games, on March 12 in London, England. The Lee Valley Velopark opened to the general public on March 31, 2014 and offers all four Olympic cycling disciplines of track, BMX, road and mountain biking. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Today, the U.S. Olympic Committee is expected to name the city that will bid to host the 2024 Summer Olympics. Boston, Washington, San Francisco and Los Angeles are competing to win that competition. The U.S. hasn’t hosted the summer games since Atlanta in 1996.

Rio won the bid to host the 2016 Summer Olympics and Tokyo got the nod for the 2020 games. London hosted the summer games in 2012, so we thought we’d check in there to see what the legacy is two years later. Did the games live up their promise as a boost for the city?

Read more
NPR Story
2:05 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

California Dairy Owners Find Greener Pastures In Midwest

Dairy farmer Brian Azevedo plans to sell his dairy in Merced, Calif., and move to South Dakota. (Ezra David Romero/Harvest Public Media)

California is the nation’s number one dairy state. It’s branded as the state with happy cows, but not necessarily happy dairy owners. For many of them, drought, feed costs and development pressure mean it’s getting tougher to make a living.

That’s why some are some selling their cattle and heading to the Midwest.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Grant Gerlock of Harvest Public Media reports.

Read more
NPR Story
2:05 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

Football May Be More Popular — And Shameful — Than Ever

Ray Rice #27 of the Baltimore Ravens sits on the bench against the Dallas Cowboys in the first half of their preseason game at AT&T Stadium on August 16, 2014 in Arlington, Texas. Rice was let go from the Baltimore Ravens after a video surfaced from TMZ showing Rice knocking his then-fiance unconscious in a casino elevator. (Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

The recent start of the college football playoffs drew the largest audience in the history of cable television, with 28.2 million TV viewers watching Oregon beat Florida State. And NFL games continue to dominate primetime TV.

This comes as football is under increased scrutiny for the injuries sustained by many players, and amid controversies over how the NFL handles players accused of domestic abuse.

Read more
NPR Story
2:12 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

HBO’s 'The Wire' Now Looks As Modern As It Feels

"The Wire" premiered on HBO in 2002. It was remastered and released on Monday, January 5, for digital HD purchase. (HBO)

Fans binge-watching the newly-released, high definition episodes of HBO’s classic cop show “The Wire” might feel like the decade-old show’s storylines are ripped from today’s headlines.

Read more
NPR Story
2:12 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

New Congress Includes Veterans, But None From WWII

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 2:22 pm

A number of military veterans are among the new members of Congress set to swear in Tuesday. Many will have served in the recent wars of Iraq and Afghanistan. Notably, however, the 114th Congress will be without a World War II veteran for the first time since 1944.

Veterans In Congress

Read more
NPR Story
2:12 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Rising Rents In 2014 Led By Small Cities

According to the Wall Street Journal, rents in Denver, Colo. rose 7.9% in 2014, second only to San Jose, Calif at 9.2%. The average rate rose 3.6% last year. (seanmugs/Flickr)

Average rents increased across the country by 3.6 percent in 2014, according to new data from the real estate research firm Reis, Inc. The average monthly lease rate is now $1,124.38, the highest number since Reis started collecting data in 1980.

It’s the fifth year in a row that rents have been on the rise, but this year rent increases affected residents in smaller and midsize cities, and not just the largest cities in the U.S.

Read more
NPR Story
1:20 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Renee Graham's Picks For Quintessentially American Music

Blues Legend B.B. King performs his 10,000th concert at B.B. KIng Blues Club & Grill in Times Square on April 18, 2006 in New York City. (Astrid Stawiarz/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 2:49 pm

American composers, singers and other musicians have produced some great music, from country-western to jazz and hip-hop. In a new Here & Now series, host Robin Young asks people to share a playlist of songs they view as quintessentially American music. Up first is Here & Now pop culture critic Renee Graham, who shares the playlist below.

Read more

Pages