Here and Now

Mondays-Thursdays, 1-3 p.m. on KUAR
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews. A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is trailing ever so slightly behind his opponents in the Labor Party, just before tomorrow’s parliamentary election. That’s according to the latest and last poll before voters cast their ballots tomorrow.

States Scramble To Comply With Fed ID Cards

Mar 16, 2015

If you have a driver’s license you probably use it for more than driving: you verify your credit card, you prove your age if you want to buy a beer, you prove your identity to get on a plane.

But what if you showed your driver’s license and it was no good?

That’s starting to happen to people in a number of states that have yet to fully comply with the federal government’s REAL ID Act.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Jessica Robinson reports from Idaho.

Fish is a slippery business. Managing and policing the seafood industry has proved challenging through the years with reports of over-fishing, controversies about fish farming, and issues of oceanic pollution. Now, we can add seafood fraud to that list.

On Sunday, a task force convened by the Obama administration released an action plan to stop seafood fraud.

At a press conference this morning, Dallas police identified a suspect in the March 4 shooting death of Iraqi immigrant Ahmed Al-Jumaili last week. Nykerion Nealon, a black 17-year-old, was arrested last night and charged with murder.

Al-Jumaili was shot while taking pictures of his first snowfall outside his new home in Dallas, Texas. Community leaders say it’s left many Muslims who live in the area feeling afraid.

On Wednesday, Utah approved the first white-collar felon public registry in the country. The registry needs final approval from the governor and it would include a recent photo of white-collar offenders, their eye color, hair color, date of birth, height and weight.

Just once per century, the date and time line up with the first 10 digits of the mathematical symbol pi (π). Saturday at 9:26:53 is the big moment.

Pi has perplexed and puzzled mathematicians for millennia. We learn it in school as having something to do with circles, but it turns up as the solution to lots of other problems, even when there are no circles involved.

Are Women's Colleges Still Relevant?

Mar 12, 2015

Sweet Briar College, a small women’s school in Virginia, announced last week that it will close in August. Students, faculty, staff and alumnae were caught by surprise. The college’s president, James Jones, announced that enrollment was down and the college couldn’t cover its expenses.

For the first time in about a century, there are no working union coal miners in Kentucky. The state’s few remaining union coal miners were laid off New Years Eve when Patriot Coal’s Highland Mine in Western Kentucky shut down.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Erica Peterson of WFPL reports that the union is struggling to appeal to younger coal miners, but others feel organized labor still has a role to play.

Obama And Unions Clash On Trade Deal

Mar 12, 2015

This week, labor leaders let President Obama know that when it comes to foreign trade, they are living on opposite sides of the tracks – the fast track, that is. That’s a term people use for giving a president the power to negotiate a trade agreement, and then put the final package on a “fast track” through Congress.

Lawmakers can give it a yes-or-no vote, but can’t amend the deal. Presidents have been using this power for decades, but only because Congress has regularly renewed it. Now the authority has expired, which is making it tough for Obama to wrap up an Asian trade deal.

On Tuesday, a California federal jury delivered its verdict after eight days of trial testimony examining whether Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams’ song “Blurred Lines” infringed on the copyright for Marvin Gaye’s 1977 hit “Got to Give It Up.”

The Gaye estate walked away with a victory and Thicke and Williams were ordered to pay more than $7 million in damages, plus profits attributable to infringement. It is a sad day for the “Blurred Lines” duo, but what could the ruling mean for the music industry?

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