Here and Now

Mondays-Friday, 1-3 p.m. on KUAR
Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

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NPR Story
4:01 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

What Airline Hub Closures Mean For Communities

A United Airlines sits on the tarmac at San Francisco International Airport on January 23, 2014 in San Francisco, California. United Airlines parent company United Continental Holdings reported a surge in fourth quarter profits with earnings of $140 million compared to a loss of $620 million one year ago. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

This weekend, United Airlines announced it was cutting roughly 60 percent of its departures from Cleveland, beginning this spring. The move effectively eliminates United’s hub at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

Yesterday, city officials gave their official response to the news, doing their best to put a positive spin on it. We hear a report from Brian Bull of WCPN, a Here & Now contributor station.

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NPR Story
5:03 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Dining Out At The Dawn Of The 1900s

Hotel Astor, December 7, 1904, Byron Company. (From the book "Repast: Dining Out at the Dawn of the New American Century, 1900-1910" by Michael Lesy and Lisa Stoffer)

When did Americans, raised on the food of the Puritans — some meat or fish, some potatoes, some corn — start eating the food of immigrants who came after them?

Author and Hampshire College literary journalism professor Michael Lesy takes up that question in one chapter of his latest book, written with his wife Lisa Stoffer, “Repast: Dining Out at the Dawn of the New American Century, 1900-1910.”

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NPR Story
5:03 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

With Hoffman's Death, A Look At Heroin Use

New York City Police Department investigators leave the apartment building of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman after he was reported dead on February 2, 2014 in the Greenwich Village area of New York. (Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue February 4, 2014 10:35 am

The New York City medical examiner’s office is doing an autopsy today on the body of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman. The actor and father of three was found on Sunday in his Manhattan apartment, dead of an apparent heroin overdose.

Philadelphia social worker and former heroin addict Jeff Deeney writes about Hoffman’s death in a piece in The Atlantic:

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NPR Story
5:03 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

U.S. Banks In Buyer's War For Loan Officers

Refinancing has plummeted, so with peak home purchasing season on the horizon, banks are trying to beef up their new home loan business.

Some banks that have laid off workers in their re-fi call centers are now engaged in bidding wars for experienced home loan officers.

Cardiff Garcia of the Financial Times joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

Researchers Create Pizza That Lasts 3 Years

Military researchers in Natick are using cutting-edge pizza technology to create state-of-the-art slices that can last up to three years at 80 degrees. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Pizza is an American favorite, with 93 percent of Americans eating pizza at least once a month. In Natick, Mass., researchers are using cutting-edge technology to creating state-of-the-art slices for the U.S. military.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Bruce Gellerman of WBUR delivers our report.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

Massive Super Bowl Security Preparations Underway

Super Bowl security measures have involved dogs, boats, divers and military jet drills. Reuters reporter Scott Malone speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about the huge security measures in place for the Super Bowl stadium in New Jersey and the Super Bowl street fair in New York City.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

'Peter Brook: The Tightrope' Is A Rare Look At A Legendary Director

Theatre and film director Peter Brook, left, and his son, director Simon Brooks, pose during the 69th Venice Film Festival on September 5, 2012 at Venice Lido. (Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

Peter Brook: The Tightrope” is a documentary about famed director and theatrical sage Peter Brook.

The film, directed by Brook’s son, Simon Brook, is a rare glimpse behind the scenes of a unique exercise called “the tightrope,” which Brook uses to help his actors give extraordinary performances.

NPR’s Trey Graham brings Here & Now a review of the film.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

Public Radio Super Bowl Bet: Denver Vs. Seattle

Public Radio hosts from the Broncos and Seahawks' hometowns -- Seattle's Andy Hurst and Denver's Jay Keller -- talk smack and place bets in anticipation of Super Bowl XLVIII. (Arturo Pardavila III/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 11:28 am

The deluge of hype, buildup, beer and pizza ads will be over on Sunday, because either the Seattle Seahawks or the Denver Broncos will rise victorious out of the swamps of Jersey — raising high the trophy that goes to the winner of Super Bowl XLVIII. Back in the hometowns, the fans are gearing up.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

What Makes Tunisia Different?

Tunisia's new Prime minister Mehdi Jomaa (left) shakes hands with his predecessor Ali Laarayedh during a handover ceremony in Tunis on January 29, 2014. (Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images)

In a rare and historic development in the Arab world this week, an Islamist party stepped down as part of an orderly democratic transfer of power. It happened in Tunisia, the country that sparked the pro-democracy uprising three years ago that became the Arab Spring.

Tunisia has seen plenty of strife in the interim, including the assassination of two liberal political leaders. But while Tunisia’s neighbors, including Egypt and Libya, have slipped on the path to democracy, Tunisia just passed the most liberal constitution in the Arab world.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

Google To Sell Motorola For $2.91 Billion

A guard stands in front of a newly opened Motorolla handphone shop in downtown Hanoi, Nov. 13, 2006. (Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images)

Google has agreed to sell Motorola to the Chinese technology giant Lenovo. This comes just two years after Google paid $12.5 billion to buy the company.

Google was counting that getting into the mobile cellphone business would pay off, but that didn’t happen. However, this isn’t a total financial loss for Google. The company is keeping billion of dollars’ worth of Motorola patents.

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