Marketplace

Mondays-Fridays, 6:30-7 p.m. on KUAR
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth reporting that's transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

It's striking just how unpopular the tax overhaul has become.

Taxes aren’t the only topic under debate in Congress right now. Today a committee in the House takes up a comprehensive bill to rewrite the federal Higher Education Act. The process is expected to take months … and could affect everything from how students pay for college to campus free speech.   

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(U.S. Edition) Not many people are on board with the GOP's plan to overhaul the tax system. Less than a third of Americans like it, according to several polls —  including one from Reuters. But there is one group that's excited about it: small businesses. Juanita Duggan, president and CEO of the National Federation of Independent Business, explains why. Afterwards, we'll look at how countries outside of the U.S. are reacting to the plan. Germany, the U.K., France, Spain and Italy say parts of the emerging tax plan could violate World Trade Organization rules.

Holiday catalogs boost online sales

15 hours ago

Most of us do our holiday shopping online, but those catalogs keep coming. That’s because stores see a role for the glossy catalogs.

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(Global Edition) From BBC World Service … Two years after the Paris climate accord was signed, how much progress has been made? French President Emmanuel Macron thinks President Trump will bring the U.S. back into the deal. Influential think-thank The Rand Corporation is predicting any break with the European Union will hurt the British economy. But they say there is one outlying scenario which could bring benefits to the U.K., EU and the U.S. Plus: Would you like to receive $665 per month for doing absolutely nothing?

The FCC is poised to overturn net neutrality this week. One possible alternative to get online? Municipal broadband. San Francisco, Seattle, and Boston are all looking into it as an alternative to traditional internet providers. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talked with Christopher Mitchell, director of Community Broadband Networks for the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, a nonprofit that advocates for sustainable community development, about how city-provided internet would work. Below is an edited portion of their conversation.

The FCC is poised to overturn net neutrality this week. Part of that conversation is about competition – what if an internet provider becomes too expensive or provides poor service? San Francisco, Seattle, and Boston are promising municipal broadband as an alternative. What would that look like and how much would it cost? On this episode of Marketplace Tech, Molly Wood talks with Christopher Mitchell, director of Community Broadband Networks for the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, a nonprofit that advocates for sustainable community development.

12/11/17: Such a bubblicious economy

Dec 11, 2017

We’ve all heard bitcoin is volatile, risky, quite possibly a bubble. So why then the demand for bitcoin futures? We take a look at what happened during yesterday’s bitcoin futures trading launch. And in Saudi Arabia, a ban on movie theaters has been lifted, ushering in what is predicted to be a $24 billion cinema industry to offset the economy’s dependence on oil.

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced 21 new places to be deemed Superfund sites, areas with toxic pollution around the country. Being added to the Superfund list means federal officials oversee the cleanup. Yet the White House budget proposal includes a 30 percent cut for the Superfund program.

Saudi Arabia lifts ban on movie theaters

Dec 11, 2017

The announcement, made today, ends a ban that dates back to the 1980s. Saudis will be able to go out to the movies as soon as next year. It’s all part of a push by the Saudi royal family to diversify the economy away from oil.

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