Marketplace

Mondays-Fridays, 6:30-7 p.m. on KUAR
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth reporting that's transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

President Donald Trump is killing regulations with a caveat — many are already dead. In a meeting with House Republicans last month, the president said: “In the history of our country, no president, during their entire term, has cut more regulations than we’ve cut." But according to Alan Levin of Bloomberg, the president is exaggerating.

Bringing regulation to cryptocurrency

Dec 11, 2017

Bitcoin’s wild ride is getting even wilder. Yesterday saw the launch of bitcoin futures, trading on the Chicago Board Options Exchange. Interest was so high it nearly crashed the CBOE website and the exchange briefly halted trading a couple of times after the price jumped erratically. So, we’ve all heard bitcoin is volatile, risky, maybe a bubble. So why then the demand for bitcoin futures? 

Medical school students today are trained to diagnose complicated diseases, but they are rarely trained to engineer the solutions themselves. To change that, soon Texas A&M University will start training doctors and nurses to also be engineers.

A recent ribbon cutting in downtown Denver gave a snapshot of electric vehicle charging in the U.S.

The event, dubbed “Ride into the Future,” brought in several car companies with EVs for people to test drive around the block. There were electric bikes too. But, the real highlight was the unveiling of the first electric car fast charger in Denver’s LoDo neighborhood.

While there are already more than 150 charges citywide, Cindy Patton, who runs parking and mobility services for the City of Denver, said the new installation is a win against climate change. 

Another 228,000 jobs were added to the U.S. economy last month. The unemployment rate stayed steady at 4.1 percent — a 17-year low. Nearly a decade after the Great Recession, the U.S. economy is almost where it was before the 2008 economic crisis. Almost.

Hourly wages are still low — growing at just 2.5 percent over the last year. And more than 4.8 million people work part-time jobs, despite wanting and being able to work full-time.

12/11/2017: Janet Yellen's last Fed meeting

Dec 11, 2017

(Markets Edition) The Fed will likely raise interest rates before the end of 2017, the third increase this year. Julia Coronado, founder of MacroPolicy Perspectives, stopped by to discuss what else we should expect from the upcoming Fed meeting, given that it'll be Janet Yellen's last as the chair. Afterwards, we'll talk about Volkswagen's surprising statement that Germany should phase out diesel subsidies, then look at how one rural Alaska village is establishing a reindeer herd to improve the community's diet and boost its economy.

'Tis the season for ugly sweaters, festive lights, and presents — at least, when you're home. Things can get a little confusing when all that holiday stuff makes the jump to your workplace. Is it appropriate to get your co-workers holiday gifts, even if you're not sure they celebrate the holidays? Or what about the infamous office party — should you really let loose, or maybe go light on the spiked eggnog?

Most credit card users these days want something back – like points, miles or money.

“People of all shapes and sizes, all income levels, they all prefer cash back for their credit card rewards,” said Matt Schulz, with Creditcards.com. He said store cards can’t compete with perks from cards like Visa and American Express, which are in an arms race of rewards.

A big date on the economic calendar this week: the Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee meeting Dec. 12 and 13. We’ll find out Wednesday whether it’s raising short-term interest rates again. An important piece of the economic puzzle landed on today with the November jobs report. It showed unemployment at a low 4.1 percent and middling wage growth — just 2.5 percent year-over-year.

(U.S. Edition) The first-ever Bitcoin futures began trading last night, which saw big price swings within minutes. On today's show, discuss what futures trading means for the cryptocurrency and investors. Afterwards, we'll examine why the Fed is looking at an interest rate hike this week, and the potential pitfalls of that decision. Plus: We look at how one 21-year-old student from Puerto Rico is handling her move to Florida after Hurricane Maria. 

 

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