Morning Edition

Mondays-Fridays, 5-9 a.m. on KUAR

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

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Business
5:39 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Feds Raid 7-Eleven Stores In Immigration Scam

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 12:52 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. Authorities in New York have announced the arrest of eight men and one woman who operate several 7-Eleven convenience stores in New York and in Virginia. They're accused of staffing their stores with undocumented workers and then stealing those workers' wages.

From member station WNYC, Ilya Marritz has details.

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NPR Story
4:35 am
Tue June 18, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 12:52 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is home detention.

The story comes to us from New Zealand, where authorities have been locking up some criminals in their homes rather than jail. House arrest is a lot cheaper, but it turns out that serving time at home is not as comfortable as you might think.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Space
4:35 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Remembering Astronaut Sally Ride's Historic Journey

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 12:55 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NASA introduced eight new astronauts yesterday. The space agency says they will lay the groundwork for missions to an asteroid and eventually Mars.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

For the first time, half the new astronauts are women whose paths can be traced back to an event that happened 30 years ago today.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

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NPR Story
4:27 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Conn. Law May Discourage Mental Illness Sufferers From Getting Help

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 12:52 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene, good morning.

After the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut six months ago, many states looked for ways to keep guns out of the hands of people with mental illnesses. Now, a new law in Connecticut can take gun licenses away from people who voluntarily check into mental health facilities. Some people fear this will discourage people from getting help.

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NPR Story
4:27 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 12:52 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with Ben Bernanke's future.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: OK, President Obama has given the clearest hint yet, that Ben Bernanke's time as chairman of the Federal Reserve may soon be up. In an interview that aired last night on PBS's "Charlie Rose" program, the president said this...

(SOUNDBITE OF "CHARLIE ROSE" SHOW)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: I think Ben Bernanke's done an outstanding job. Ben Bernanke's a little bit like Bob Mueller, the head of the FBI...

CHARLIE ROSE, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
3:14 am
Tue June 18, 2013

3-D Printer Brings Dexterity To Children With No Fingers

The newest version of the Robohand is made of snap-together parts, reducing the amount of hardware needed.
Courtesy of Jen Owen of Jen Martin Studios

Originally published on Wed June 19, 2013 2:24 pm

Richard Van As was working in his home near Johannesburg, South Africa, in May of 2011, when he lost control of his table saw.

"It's a possibility that it was a lack of concentration," he says. "It's just that the inevitable happened."

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Author Interviews
2:08 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Spy Reporter Works Her 'Sources' To Write A Thriller

Mary Louise Kelly spent two decades traveling the world as a reporter for NPR and the BBC.
Katarina Price Gallery Books

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 12:52 pm

Mary Louise Kelly used to cover the national security beat for NPR, but lately she's turned her attention to teaching and writing fiction. Her new novel, Anonymous Sources, follows rookie journalist Alexandra James as she investigates a shady banana shipment and a clandestine nuclear plot. The tale is fiction, but it draws on Kelly's own experiences reporting on the spy beat, including things she couldn't say when she was a journalist.

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Law
2:07 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Why The FISA Court Is Not What It Used To Be

A copy of the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court order requiring Verizon to give the National Security Agency information about calls in its systems, both within the U.S. and between the U.S. and other countries.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 12:52 pm

The furor over recently exposed government surveillance programs has posed an abundance of political challenges for both President Obama and Congress. Relatively unmentioned in all of this, however, is the role of the courts — specifically, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, known as the FISA court, and how its role has changed since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

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Parallels
2:07 am
Tue June 18, 2013

Libyan Radio Station Promotes Democracy, One Rap At A Time

Libyan presenters work at the studio of Radio Zone in Tripoli, Libya, in 2012. The radio station's owners hope to teach a new generation about democracy.
Mahmud Turkia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 12:52 pm

Many of the militia fighters who rose up and ousted former dictator Moammar Gadhafi in 2011 have refused to lay down their arms and are still challenging the post-revolutionary government.

Yet the militias are facing a challenge of their own. They now come under verbal attack on one of Libya's newest radio stations, Radio Zone.

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Law
1:03 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Supreme Court Rejects Arizona's Proof Of Citizenship Law

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Monday, this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene. We're reporting this morning on a decision just out from the U.S. Supreme Court. The court tossed out an Arizona law that required proof of citizenship for its voters. In a 7-2 decision the justices said the state's voter-approved Proposition 200 interfered with federal law.

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