Arkansas Agriculture

American Phytopathological Society

Arkansas researchers say a disease that can cut peanut yields by half if left unchecked has been discovered in a plot near Newport.

Early leaf spot is a fungal disease that affects the leaves of peanut plants. Symptoms include circular brown lesions with a yellow halo. The fungus also produces silvery, fuzzy tufts of spores on the top side of the leaf.

Plant pathologist Travis Faske says it's unlikely this year's peanut crop will be threatened by the disease because it's only been detected in an isolated research plot.

A week after Republican senate candidate Tom Cotton launched a six-figure ad buy explaining his farm bill vote three major fact-checking organizations have rejected the ad’s premises. In the commercial Cotton said President Barack Obama “hijacked” the farm bill by funding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – commonly referred to as food stamps. 

Factcheck.org, the Washington Post, and Politifact note food stamps have been part of the farm bill since 1973.

Arkansas Sec. of Agriculture Butch Calhoun
aad.arkansas.gov / Arkansas Agriculture Department

A government loan extension for Arkansas farmers was touted Tuesday by Arkansas’s U.S. Representatives as needed assistance after a grain firm failed to pay farmers. The United States Department of Agriculture granted a 60 day extension on Farm Service Agency Marketing Assistance Loans used by east Arkansas farmers to plant crops.

Arkansas Agriculture Secretary Butch Calhoun said the collapse of Turner Grain Merchandising, a middleman for farmers and grain buyers, means farmers didn’t get the money from the grain brokerage to repay loans used in planting.

A new report says flooding that began in late June will lead to millions of dollars lost in crop value for Arkansas farmers.
 
 The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports farmers in 10 Arkansas counties are expected to lose more than $35 million in crop value. The University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service study says the full extent won't be known until after harvest.
 

Delta Plastics Irrigation
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Delta Plastics and a consortium of agricultural interests in Arkansas have launched a new water conservation software initiative that leaders say could reduce water usage by 20 percent by the year 2020.

"This initiative is the most important conservation effort we have ever launched," said Dhu Thompson, Delta Plastics Chairman. "‘Preserving our farmland’ has been our company slogan for nearly 20 years. But conservation and sustainability is so much more than a slogan for us. It is a principle that has driven every major operational decision that we have made."

An Arkansas agriculture professor is using a kite to take aerial photos of soybean fields in his research to develop more drought-tolerant plants.

The Southwest Times Record reports University of Arkansas professor Larry Purcell is using the kites to get around a federal agency's rules on flying remote controlled aircrafts for commercial purposes.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack has made disaster declarations for farmers and ranchers in 10 Arkansas counties who suffered losses due to storms that began in the affected areas June 29.

Vilsack issued disaster declarations Wednesday in response to flood conditions in Cross, Independence, Jackson, Lee, Lonoke, Monroe, Prairie, St. Francis, White and Woodruff counties.

Arkansas Sec. of Agriculture Butch Calhoun
aad.arkansas.gov / Arkansas Agriculture Department

Arkansas farmers are working to salvage the current growing season, but losses in some areas are expected to be huge.

"I've seen estimates as high as over $200 million just on soybeans," said Arkansas Agriculture Secretary Butch Calhoun.  Corn and rice were also hard hit when 10 inches of rain fell in east Arkansas on June 29.  Repeated rainfall since has further complicated recovery efforts.

Calhoun says many growers are replanting, but that it's risky at this point.

Heavy weekend rains left many farmers in east Arkansas with flooded fields, and the water is so deep in places the ground won't dry out soon enough for them to replant.

A little more than 10 inches of rain fell in parts of the eastern half of the state, where farmers were still assessing damage Monday.

The National Weather Service issued flood warnings along the Cache River near Patterson, the White River near Augusta and on the L'Anguille River at Palestine.

Arkansas soybean growers are facing a challenge from a pest that's new to the state -- the pea weevil.

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture said Wednesday that the weevil appears to have come from Europe and found its way to Phillips County in eastern Arkansas.

The pest has been found so far only in several fields near Marvell - but it has also surfaced in Louisiana and Washington state.

UA system entomologist Gus Lorenz says immature weevils feed on soybean roots and mature pea weevils eat the leaves.

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