Arkansas Civil Rights

Arkansas Still Unsupportive of Gay Marriage

Mar 25, 2013
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As the Supreme Court considers the legality of gay marriage this week, the latest national polls show an increasing majority of Americans support same-sex unions. Arkansas, meanwhile, remains largely divided over the issue with a majority who say there should be no legal recognition of a gay couple’s relationship.

Students at Little Rock’s Central High are embracing the school’s rich history and making it their own. What started out as a freshman civics assignment is now the Memory Project, an ongoing oral history compilation about social and human rights issues.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR

55 years ago, a modest home on West 28th Street in Little Rock was where the Little Rock Nine would meet to coordinate efforts to integrate Central High School.

During the days when National Guard troops kept them out of the school, it’s also where they would meet with tutors in the basement to keep up with their studies.

Today the home of L. C. and Daisy Bates is restored to the way it looked in those days and is available for tours from the National Park Service.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR

The nine African-Americans who integrated Central High School in 1957 are being featured in this week's issue of the New Yorker that looks at civil rights icons.

Standing in front of the school, the nine posed for the renowned photographer known as Platon, who has taken portraits of presidents and world leaders and was brought to Little Rock by the magazine for the assignment.

Members of the Little Rock Nine are now in their late 60s.  Only three live in Arkansas today, with the rest spread out around the world.

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