Arkansas Congressional Delegation

Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

With the tax filing deadline looming, Donald Trump’s returns took the spotlight early on Monday's town hall meeting with U.S. Senator Tom Cotton and U.S. Representative French Hill. The two Republicans were met with plenty of unsatisfied constituents among the 1000 or so in attendance.

"As far as I’m aware the President says he’s still under audit and he’s going to release them when he’s done," said Cotton in response to a question. Cotton's response drew some of the loudest jeers of the day.

Central Arkansas Congressman appeared before constituents in a town hall format for the first time of the Trump era on Monday. Hill faced a raucous, but politically split crowd. He was joined by U.S. Senator Tom Cotton.

The Republican senator said he talked with Governor Asa Hutchinson that morning about executions originally slated to begin Monday evening.

“I told him that I 100 percent support his decision to execute the verdict that was rendered by a jury of his peers,” said Cotton to a mix of jeers and cheers.

Central Arkansas Congressman French Hill is holding his first town hall meeting since President Donald Trump took office at a west Little Rock hotel during the workday next Monday. U.S. Senator Tom Cotton will join him.

The state's junior Senator has participated in several town hall style public meetings, some with other Arkansas congressman, replete with hundreds of upset constituents. The event Monday will be Sen. Cotton's first town hall in central Arkansas.

Representative Congressman Rick Crawford
crawford.house.gov

Republican First District Congressman Rick Crawford says in a statement to KUAR that he fully supports President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan’s decision to take additional time “to get health care reform right instead of right now.”

Pipe laying idle in the yard of Welspun Tubular in east Little Rock (2014 file photo).
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Arkansas’s congressman may be divided on healthcare reform but they are squarely lined-up when it comes to cheering the State Department’s green-light for Keystone XL Pipeline. 

U.S. Senator Tom Cotton said the decision puts working families “ahead of the demands of left-wing donors for a change.” Senator John Boozman noted a Little Rock manufacturer, Welspun Tubular, manufactured hundreds of miles of the pipeline. Central  Arkansas U.S. Representative French Hill claimed the cross-nation “pro-growth” pipeline will have “a minimal impact on the environment.”

UPDATE: Pence's visit to Arkansas has been canceled according to state GOP officials.

From earlier:

Vice President Mike Pence will be in Little Rock on Friday, on the heels of whatever happens in the U.S. House of Representatives to efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Delta Regional Authority Chairman Chris Masingill and Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR News

Funding for the Delta Regional Authority would be eliminated under President Trump’s first budget request to Congress. The federal agency is set up to help encourage and coordinate economic development in eight states, including Arkansas, tied to the beleaguered Mississippi River Delta region.

From Sen. John Boozman's Office:

Sen. John Boozman will be holding a telephone town hall on Monday night, Feb. 27. Boozman will be holding the town hall from his Washington D.C. office starting at 7:30 p.m.

During the town hall, Arkansans can phone in with questions for the senator. Anyone who is interested in participating in the phone conversation can sign up on Boozman’s website so they can be dialed into the call.

Sen. Tom Cotton faced an angry reception at a town hall forum in the Northwest Arkansas Ozarks. The crowd of 2,200 people filled the Springdale High School auditorium to capacity Wednesday to pepper the conservative Arkansas Republican with questions about everything from immigration and health care reform to President Donald Trump's ties to Russia.

Tom Cotton
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., on Tuesday (Feb. 7) introduced a bill meant to reduce legal immigration levels by 50%, which he said would increase wages earned by American workers.

According to Cotton’s office, the Reforming American Immigration for Strong Employment (RAISE) Act would reduce overall legal immigrants to 637,960 in its first year and to 539,958 by its tenth year, compared to 1,051,031 immigrants in 2015.

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