Arkansas Education

Eclipse
NASA

Arkansas will join much of the U.S. Monday in seeing a partial eclipse of the sun for the first time in almost 100 years. Local experts say the state will see a lot of sun coverage, producing unusual sights in the daytime sky.

Dr. Tony Hall, an astronomy professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, says people all over the nation can see a partial or full eclipse.

This is press release from Jonesboro Attorney Bobby McDaniel: 

A judge in northeast Arkansas has awarded $150 million in a civil lawsuit to the families of five people who were fatally shot outside an Arkansas school in 1998.

The families' attorney, Bobby McDaniel, says they probably won't ever see the money, but hopes the Monday ruling will prevent Andrew Golden and Mitchell Johnson from profiting from the shooting.

Golden and Johnson set off a fire alarm at Westside Middle School in Jonesboro and shot at people as they evacuated the school.

The S.P.A.C.E Hogs group at the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville.
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Students and scientists from around Arkansas will gather in Fulton, Missouri next Monday for the first cross-continental solar eclipse in almost 100 years. In addition to just enjoying the sight, they’re also planning to document and collect information for NASA.

Dr. James Kennon saw his first solar eclipse in 1991, and it was so spectacular, he knew it wouldn’t be his last.

"The one I saw in Hawaii, I watched it, and I’m standing there thinking, 'do that again! I want to see that again," he said. "The one I saw in Hawaii lasted a little over four minutes."

KUAR

Officials with eStem Public Charter Schools, joined by Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola, cut the ribbon Saturday to open their new high school location on the campus of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, perhaps the first charter school on the campus of a public university in the nation.

"The future is here; the future is today," said eStem CEO John Bacon in christening the new, approximately 33,000-square-foot building.

Daniel Breen / KUAR News

The University of Arkansas System has announced a new partnership between two of its institutions with a goal of boosting the number of college graduates in Arkansas. System president Donald Bobbitt unveiled the “Metro 2+2” degree program at a press conference Thursday in Little Rock.

Student loan borrowers are carrying debts later into life and are finding it harder to make big purchases, like a first home. In fact, a 2016 survey by the National Association of Realtors, and American Student Assistance, a non-profit, found almost three-quarters of all borrowers say their student loans are the reason they aren't purchasing a house.

Arkansas has until this fall to rewrite a wide-ranging education plan under the new federal law, Every Student Succeeds Act based on stakeholder feedback solicited on a draft this summer.

The Act replaces the Bush Administration era’s No Child Left Behind. In contrast to its predecessor, the new federal law moves away from ranking schools based on standardized tests and toward state control and a more diverse set of metrics.

Chris Hickey / KUAR News

Forums, concerts, exhibitions and other events will be held this fall to mark the 60th anniversary of the integration of Little Rock’s Central High School.Reflections of Progress” is the slogan for commemorative activities. 

On September 25th, 1957, troops from the 101st Airborne Division escorted nine black students into the once all-white school. That followed after an angry white mob and Governor Orval Faubus’ National Guard preventing the students from attending class, nearly three years after Brown v. Board Supreme Court decision.

The impact of social media and the internet on political and cultural movements of all stripes - from peaceful political organizing to radicalization, is pretty widely recognized now-a-days. But methods for studying, categorizing, and tracking online groups still has a ways to go.

KUAR’s Jacob Kauffman sat down to talk about government research with Dr. Nitin Agarwal with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. The conversation covers a range of national security issues from Saudi women's rights, to ISIS Twitter bots, to how Russians perceive NATO exercises.

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