Arkansas Education

Daniel Breen / KUAR News

Visitors to Little Rock's Central High School will now have a way to explore the school’s historic past. An app developed by the Central High Civil Rights Memory Project in partnership with the Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, uses first-person accounts to narrate a walking tour of the school.

George West taught civics at Central High, and now serves as education outreach coordinator at the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies. He has seen firsthand the impact the project has had on students.

Facebook is expanding a partnership with Arkansas and will donate virtual reality kits to every public high school in the state.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced Monday the state and the social media giant are expanding the TechStart Partnership, which was announced earlier this year to generate interest in computer science careers and instruction.

Facebook originally donated 400 virtual reality classroom kits, including computers, cameras and Oculus Rift equipment, to approximately 250 schools.

Gibbs Magnet Elementary School in Little Rock.
LRSD.org

The threat of a protest at Gibbs Magnet Elementary School in Little Rock today derailed a planned speaking appearance by U.S. Representative French Hill. A parent complained about Hill's support for Donald Trump and fears children would be used as a photo-op.

UPDATE: Congressman Hill responded to the matter in a statement.

Daniel Breen / KUAR News

Conflicting messages of success and dissatisfaction were the predominant themes of a town hall meeting with officials from the Arkansas Department of Education, state lawmakers and the Little Rock School District Thursday. The optimistic assessments of the state of district schools by Superintendent Michael Poore and Education Commissioner Johnny Key contrasted with vocal opposition from the public.

Foundation Gives $120 Million To Establish UA School Of Art

Aug 23, 2017

The Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation will donate $120 million to the University of Arkansas to create a school of art. Talk Business & Politics reports the gift, announced Wednesday, is the largest ever given to a U.S. university to support or build a school of art.

Eclipse
NASA

Arkansas will join much of the U.S. Monday in seeing a partial eclipse of the sun for the first time in almost 100 years. Local experts say the state will see a lot of sun coverage, producing unusual sights in the daytime sky.

Dr. Tony Hall, an astronomy professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, says people all over the nation can see a partial or full eclipse.

This is press release from Jonesboro Attorney Bobby McDaniel: 

A judge in northeast Arkansas has awarded $150 million in a civil lawsuit to the families of five people who were fatally shot outside an Arkansas school in 1998.

The families' attorney, Bobby McDaniel, says they probably won't ever see the money, but hopes the Monday ruling will prevent Andrew Golden and Mitchell Johnson from profiting from the shooting.

Golden and Johnson set off a fire alarm at Westside Middle School in Jonesboro and shot at people as they evacuated the school.

The S.P.A.C.E Hogs group at the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville.
Facebook

Students and scientists from around Arkansas will gather in Fulton, Missouri next Monday for the first cross-continental solar eclipse in almost 100 years. In addition to just enjoying the sight, they’re also planning to document and collect information for NASA.

Dr. James Kennon saw his first solar eclipse in 1991, and it was so spectacular, he knew it wouldn’t be his last.

"The one I saw in Hawaii, I watched it, and I’m standing there thinking, 'do that again! I want to see that again," he said. "The one I saw in Hawaii lasted a little over four minutes."

KUAR

Officials with eStem Public Charter Schools, joined by Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola, cut the ribbon Saturday to open their new high school location on the campus of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, perhaps the first charter school on the campus of a public university in the nation.

"The future is here; the future is today," said eStem CEO John Bacon in christening the new, approximately 33,000-square-foot building.

Pages