Arkansas Elections

A Republican candidate for a state Senate seat says he cannot overcome the 67-margin that separated him from the leader in a primary runoff, but a Democratic candidate wants to see if he picks up any votes in a canvass.

Ascent Children Services CEO Dan Sullivan says he will not contest balloting that made former AT&T manager John Cooper the GOP nominee for a Senate post from Jonesboro.

Fewer than 100 votes separated the top candidates from the also-rans after ballots were counted in the party primary runoffs for a state senate seat in northeastern Arkansas.

Jonesboro businessman Steve Rockwell led Valley View Schools Superintendent Radius Baker by 24 votes in the Democratic primary, while former AT&T manager John Cooper led Ascent Children's Services CEO Dan Sullivan by 67 votes among Republicans.

If the results stand, Rockwell and Cooper would face off Jan. 14 in a special election to replace former Sen. Paul Bookout, who resigned in August.

Voters in northeast Arkansas are choosing the Democratic and Republican nominees for a special election to replace a state senator who resigned amid an ethics investigation.

The primary runoff Tuesday will determine who will face off in the Jan. 14 special election to replace former Sen. Paul Bookout, who resigned in August.

AG Dustin McDaniel (D)
Nathan Vandiver / KUAR

Attorney General Dustin McDaniel has rejected the wording of a proposed ballot measure aimed at limiting corporate spending to influence elections in Arkansas.

McDaniel rejected the proposal's wording on Wednesday, citing what he said were ambiguities and deficiencies in the proposed ballot title and text. 

McDaniel has to certify the wording of a proposed measure before groups can begin gathering signatures needed to qualify for a spot on the ballot.

The proposal that McDaniel rejected on Wednesday comes from the Regnat Populus Ballot Question Committee.

Arkansas Lawmakers To Review Voter ID Rules

Oct 9, 2013

Arkansas lawmakers are reviewing the rules for enforcing a new state law that will require voters to show photo identification when they cast a ballot.

A subcommittee of the Legislative Council was scheduled Wednesday to discuss the rules that the state Board of Election Commissioner approved for enforcing the voter ID law.

The Republican-controlled Legislature enacted the law earlier this year when it overrode a veto by Democratic Gov. Mike Beebe.

The rules approved in August closely mirror those outlined in the law, which takes effect in January. 

The Arkansas Board of Election Commissioners Wednesday approved rules for enforcing a new law requiring voters to show a photo identification at the polls. It takes effect in January.

Meanwhile Alex Reed, spokesman for the Secretary of State’s office, says they’re making arrangements to provide free ID cards for those who, for one reason or another, don’t have one.

A contract with a company to provide machines to make the cards was signed Tuesday.  It’s hoped they’ll be in use by the beginning of Decmeber.

Arkansas Panel To Take Up Rules For Voter ID Law

Aug 21, 2013

A state board is taking up the rules for enforcing a new Arkansas law that will require voters to show photo identification before they can cast a ballot.

The state Board of Election Commissioners on Wednesday is scheduled to consider the rules for the voter ID law that legislators approved earlier this year.

The law requires voters to show a photo ID at the polls. The rules closely mirror the law the Republican-controlled Legislature approved in April when it overrode Democratic Gov. Mike Beebe's veto of the voter ID legislation.

The state's move toward implementing a new voter ID law and Thursday's sentencing of former Arkansas lawmaker Hudson Hallum for election fraud have raised some questions about upholding the integrity of the election process in our state.

Hallum was sentenced in federal court in Little Rock to one year of home detention and three years probation. He was also fined $20,000 and must serve 100 hours of community service.

Hudson Hallum
Danny Johnston / AP Photo

A former east Arkansas legislator convicted of conspiracy to commit election fraud is appearing in court to be sentenced. 

Former Democratic Rep. Hudson Hallum on Thursday is scheduled to appear before a federal judge for sentencing. His father, Kent Hallum, is also set to appear before the judge in a separate sentencing hearing. 

Hallum pleaded guilty in September, along with his father and two campaign workers.

Prosecutors said Hallum bribed voters and used absentee ballots to commit fraud in the 2011 election for his seat.

Arkansas Panel Reviewing Rules On Voter ID Law

Jun 19, 2013

An Arkansas panel is reviewing the rules for enforcing a new state law that will require voters to show photo identification at the polls before they can cast a ballot.

The state Board of Election Commissioners on Wednesday was scheduled to review the rules for enforcing the state's voter ID law, which takes effect next year.

Poll workers are currently required to ask for identification, but voters can still cast a ballot if they don't show ID.

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