Arkansas Elections

2nd district congressional race Democrat Dianne Curry, Libertarian Chris Hayes and Republican incumbent French Hill.
AETN

The three candidates for the state’s 2nd District congressional seat faced off in the final AETN debate, discussing banking reform, the national debt and other issues.

The debate featured Republican U.S. Rep French Hill, Democrat Dianne Curry and Libertarian Chris Hayes.

Asked what banking reforms are needed to protect smaller banks from regulations while keeping the country safe from big banks’ unsafe practices, Hill, a former banker, faulted Congress for passing the Dodd-Frank Act, saying it hurt small community banks.

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families and the Arkansas Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics released  joint statement Wednesday opposing two statewide ballot measures to legalize medical marijuana.  In a press release, the organizations gave the following reasons for the opposition:

There are currently no published studies on the efficacy of the marijuana plant as a medication in children.

1st district congressional race  Rick Crawford (R) and Mark West (L)
AETN

Republican First District Congressman Rick Crawford and his Libertarian opponent, Mark West, criticized their opposing parties’ presidential nominees and disagreed about America’s role overseas during a lively debate sponsored by AETN. The debate airs at 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Asked how he would explain Donald Trump’s recent comments about women to his female constituents, Crawford said the comments disturbed him but that Trump is still a better choice than Hillary Clinton, whose policies would be a continuation of President Barack Obama’s.

Candidates for the 4th District seat: Libertarian Kerry Hicks and Republican incumbent Bruce Westerman.
AETN

Republican Rep. Bruce Westerman said tax returns should be simple enough to be filed on a postcard, while his Libertarian challenger, Kerry Hicks of Mena, said the country must address its $19 trillion national debt.

The Arkansas Hospital Association and the Arkansas Medical Society have endorsed Issue 4, the proposed constitutional amendment directing the Legislature to set caps of at least $250,000 on non-economic damages in medical lawsuits and limiting attorney contingency fees to one-third of jury awards after expenses.

The two associations announced that their governing boards had formally endorsed the amendment in a joint press release Monday. Voters will decide on the amendment in the November 8 elections if the proposal survives two lawsuits.

petition signatures signature gathering
WESA

A "special master" appointed by the Arkansas Supreme Court to review a ballot proposal to legalize casinos in three counties says Secretary of State Mark Martin was wrong when he certified a signature petition seeking the election and placed it on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.

Asa Hutchinson
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas' governor and lieutenant governor say legalizing medical marijuana would hurt the state's efforts to attract businesses, targeting two proposals on the November ballot they claim would prevent companies from being able to enforce drug-free workplaces.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson and Lt. Gov. Tim Griffin on Wednesday were joined by business leaders as they criticized two proposals going before voters that would allow patients with certain medical conditions to buy marijuana from dispensaries. Arkansas voters narrowly rejected legalizing medical marijuana four years ago.

A retired judge appointed to review petitions for an Arkansas medical marijuana initiative has found more than enough signatures officials approved for the proposal were valid, despite efforts by opponents to disqualify it from the November ballot. 

ariel martini / flickr.com

Eighty-seven of the state’s 135 legislators, or 64.4%, have announced their opposition to Issue 5, which would create a constitutional amendment authorizing its sponsors to open three casinos in Arkansas.

Talk Business & Politics reports:

marijuana
npr.org

Arkansas voters have split attitudes on two medical marijuana proposals with few undecideds, according to the latest Talk Business & Politics-Hendrix College survey.

The poll, conducted among 831 likely Arkansas voters on September 15-17, 2016, shows one medical marijuana proposal with a plurality of support, while a second ballot issue has a small majority against it. The survey has a margin of error of 3.4%.

Voters were asked:

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