Arkansas Environment

Clean Line
Arkansas Business

Plains and Eastern Clean Line Holdings LLC officials have asked a federal court in eastern Arkansas to move a fall hearing date on a lawsuit protesting a $2 billion wind energy transmission line, saying the controversial development is “time sensitive” and that legal delays could imperil the project’s financing and three-year construction schedule.

Jayme Frye / flickr.com

With the growing season still weeks away, chicken waste that will be used as fertilizer is piling up in barns across the South and causing worries about spontaneous combustion.

A chicken litter pile this week triggered a wildfire that destroyed a mobile home before being brought under control. Agriculture officials say the right mix of moisture, texture and decomposition is needed to produce a burning pile of waste, and that farmers should be mindful of how high they stack manure in their barns.

Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

Whirlpool’s 2016 Annual Progress Report to the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality will be released on Feb. 15, according to ADEQ spokeswoman Kelly Robinson.

buffalonationalriver.com

The first of a series of meetings is scheduled Thursday for the public to share their input with a state-hired private consultant that is developing a management plan for the Buffalo River watershed.

Earlier this year Gov. Asa Hutchinson created the “Beautiful Buffalo River Watershed Action Committee” to address environmental and conservation concerns in the 878,000 acre area of north Arkansas. The committee hired FTN Associates to draw up a management plan. Thursday morning in the town of Marshall in Searcy County, FTN will take comments from interested citizens.

Executives from Massachusetts-based Clean Harbors Inc. gathered with South Arkansas government and business officials on Tuesday (Dec. 6) to christen what company officials are calling the nation’s most technologically advance incinerator of its kind to be built this century.

A stretch of the White River.
Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resource Conservation Service is making $20 million available to Arkansas landowners to restore wetlands. The program to limit future development is voluntary and funded by the 2014 Farm Bill.

Randy Childress, the Assistant State Conservationist for Easements and Watersheds at NRCS, says the process of restoring marginal farmland to wetlands could take 50 to 100 years. He’s confident restoration efforts will work.

www.adeq.state.ar.us/

A consultant hired by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality presented findings at the agency’s headquarters Thursday of subsurface tests made at a controversial swine farm near the Buffalo National River. ADEQ and environmental advocates are still mulling over the study’s details.

File photo. Attorney General Leslie Rutledge (R).
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge and Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange are leading a legal challenge of new U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regulations.

A new nature preserve is planned near the Buffalo National River after the Nature Conservancy of Arkansas purchased 1,425 acres of land in the area. 

The conservation group says the land is on a mountain near Mt. Judea along Big Creek, which flows into the Buffalo River. The group says the new preserve, which will be called Council Rock Forest, is also home to three rare bat species. 

Chris Hickey / KUAR News

A contingent of about 20 Arkansas activists gathered at the State Capitol Tuesday to voice solidarity with North Dakota Access Pipeline protesters as they challenged the newly approved Diamond Pipeline. The 440-mile pipeline is to go under construction across Oklahoma and Arkansas.

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