Arkansas Healthcare

A federal judge has temporarily blocked Arkansas from prohibiting Medicaid payments for Planned Parenthood patients, expanding her order that forced the state to continue paying for three patients. 

U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker on Thursday issued a preliminary injunction preventing the state from suspending any Medicaid payments for any patients who receive services from Planned Parenthood. Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson ended the state's Medicaid contract with the organization last year because of videos secretly recorded by an anti-abortion group. 

Cindy Gillespie DHS director
Talk Business & Politics

Arkansas’s Medicaid expansion population grew by by more than 9,000 people over the previous month to a total of 317,289 in August. Meanwhile Gov. Asa Hutchinson is asking for a comprehensive plan to address the cost of the state’s entire Medicaid program.

marijuana
npr.org

The Arkansas Supreme Court has rejected one of two efforts to block a medical marijuana proposal from the November ballot.

Arkansas Surgeon General Greg Bledsoe with Gov. Asa Hutchinson and other state health officials urging opposition to two medical marijuana ballot measures.
David Monteith / KUAR News

A few talking points against two medical marijuana ballot measures, many of them familiar, have cropped up over the past few weeks as opponents continue to make their case in a string of press conferences. Supporters of medical marijuana have heard them before and have retorts at the ready.

Jason Burt / Arkansas Business

Dr. Dan Rahn announced Monday he will retire July 31, 2017, as chancellor of the Little Rock-based University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. His departure will mark almost eight years as head of the state’s largest public employer.

UAMS has 3,021 students, 789 medical residents and five dental residents. It is the state’s largest public employer with more than 10,000 employees, including about 1,000 physicians and other medical personnel who work at the Arkansas Children’s Hospital, the VA Medical Center and UAMS regional centers in Arkansas.

Arkansas lawmakers have endorsed an agency's plan to collect a 3 percent fee on plans offered through the state's health insurance exchange.

The Arkansas Health Insurance Market Place Legislative Oversight Committee on Wednesday backed the marketplace board's plan to begin collecting the fee in December. The 3 percent fee would replace a 3.5 percent fee that has been collected by the federal government since enrollment in the exchanges began two years ago.

(file photo) Family Council Action Committee Director Jerry Cox at his office.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

One of the key opposition groups that helped narrowly defeat a medical marijuana measure in 2012 is gearing up to do the same this fall. The Family Council Action Committee outlined its arguments and announced its intention to launch an active campaign at the state Capitol on Thursday.

Family Council’s director Jerry Cox laid forth the crux of his argument against the two medical marijuana ballot measures, “These measures are simply recreational marijuana masquerading as medicine.”

Arkansas' highest court will hear arguments next month in one of two complaints against a proposed ballot measure to limit damages awarded in medical lawsuits.

The head of Medicaid under former President George W. Bush will join the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences as a visiting professor and as an adviser for Medicaid and Health Care Reform for the Arkansas Department of Human Services.

UAMS said Friday that Dennis Smith will start the positions on Sept. 15.

UAMS said Smith will spend 10 percent of his time as a visiting professor at the Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health and the remainder as an adviser on Medicaid policy and operations for DHS.

 Arkansas election officials have approved a second measure legalizing medical marijuana for the November ballot.

Secretary of State Mark Martin's office on Wednesday verified supporters of the proposed constitutional amendment legalizing the drug for some patients because they turned in more than enough signatures to qualify. Backers of the proposal turned in 97,284 signatures from registered voters, more than the 84,859 needed to earn a spot on the ballot.

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