Arkansas Healthcare

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling against a Texas abortion law has advocacy organizations in Arkansas evaluating their approach to reproductive rights in the Natural State.

A Kentucky company is spending $39 million to acquire an Arkansas state program that provides home health care to thousands of people.

The Arkansas Department of Health on Monday announced that the state signed an agreement with Kindred Healthcare, Inc. to acquire the state's in-home health care operations. State officials last year announced they were phasing out the program, provides in-home services such as health care and hospice, and shifting it to a private provider.

Medical Marijuana
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Backers of one of three marijuana-related proposals vying for the November ballot in Arkansas turned in dozens of boxloads of petitions to the Secretary of State's office Monday. Now it's up to officials to determine if there are enough legitimate signatures for it to be placed before voters.

Speaking to supporters in the Capitol Rotunda, organizer Melissa Fults with Arkansans for Compassionate Care argued the benefits are clear.

Medical Marijuana
Arkansans for Compassionate Care

The wording for three  ballot initiatives concerning marijuana have been approved by Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. Two would allow medicinal use of the drug while the third would legalize all forms of the cannabis plant. Now backers of the proposals are gathering signatures.

Four years ago voters narrowly defeated a similar proposal. “The Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act” was rejected by about 30,000 votes, 51-to-49 percent.

UAMS campus in Little Rock.
uams.edu / UAMS

Talk Business and Politics reports

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is about to embark on a critical time for revenue, Dr. Dan Rahn, the school’s chancellor, told members of a newly formed “Friends of UAMS” chapter in Fort Smith.

Talk Business and Politics reports:

A new report by the United Health Foundation shows that Arkansas is among the unhealthiest states for seniors, mainly due to the high prevalence of obesity, physical inactivity and food insecurity.

Baptist Health Medical Center

Some Arkansas doctors are concerned about an effort that would allow non-physician personnel to broaden their scope of practice into areas previously only available to licensed physicians.  

insurance.arkansas.gov / Arkansas Insurance Department

Four of the five insurers offering policies on Arkansas' insurance marketplace next year under the federal health law have proposed rate increases of at least 10 percent.

The Arkansas Insurance Department on Tuesday said QualChoice Life and Health, QCA Health Plan Inc., Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield and the national Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association have each proposed the rate increases. The department says Ambetter has proposed a rate increase below 10 percent.

The Collaborative

Arkansas has enrolled the lowest percentage of healthcare exchange-eligible residents of any state nationwide, according to analysis done by a consortium of researchers from Rhode Island universities.

According to Robert Hackey, a professor of Health Policy and Management at Providence College, the Kaiser Family Foundation data shows only 19 percent of eligible Arkansans enrolled.

Unity Health, a Searcy-based health system, announced Thursday that it is the first medical provider in Arkansas to join the Mayo Clinic Care Network.

The arrangement means Unity Health doctors will have access to electronic consulting with physicians with the Mayo Clinic, one of the country’s top-ranked medical providers by U.S. News & World Report. Patient medical information such as MRI scans will be transmitted to those doctors. Unity Health also will have access to the AskMayoExpert database with information on disease management and care guidelines.

Pages