Arkansas Healthcare

Arkansas Capitol
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas lawmakers are taking up the funding bill for the state's hybrid Medicaid expansion, despite predictions that opponents have enough votes to block the expanded coverage for thousands of poor people.

The Senate was expected Thursday to take up the Medicaid budget bill, which includes funding for the hybrid expansion. The program uses federal funds to purchase private insurance for low-income residents.

Arkansas Sen. Larry Teague speaking to reporters after Wednesday's committee vote, urging passage of the governor's plan.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR News

The written article is compiled from Associated Press reports.

Funding for Arkansas' first-in-the-nation hybrid Medicaid expansion is heading toward its first vote in the Legislature's fiscal session.

The Joint Budget Committee on a voice vote Wednesday advanced the Medicaid budget bill that funds the program, which uses federal funds to purchase private insurance for thousands of lower-income people.

The Senate is expected to take up the measure Thursday.

Arkansas House of Representatives.
ArkansasHouse.org

Arkansas lawmakers have convened a fiscal session focused on the state's budget, with a standoff looming over the state's hybrid Medicaid expansion.

Wednesday opponents of the healthcare program filed a proposal to cap enrollment and terminate the expanded coverage by the end of the year.

Republican Senator Bart Hester wants to repeal legislation signed into law last week with Gov. Asa Hutchinson's plan to rework the program. It uses federal funds to buy private insurance for low-income residents. Republican Rep. Bob Ballinger filed an identical version in the House.

hutchinson medicaid
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR News

Failure to pass his Arkansas Works program could lead to the cancellation of a planned special session for highways, Gov. Asa Hutchinson said Tuesday.

Arkansas House Speaker Jeremy Gillam during the April 2016 special session on Medicaid expansion.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Arkansas House leaders say a host of state programs including public schools, prisons and colleges would face cuts if lawmakers don't fund the state's hybrid Medicaid expansion.

Arkansas House Speaker Jeremy Gillam on Monday released an alternate budget detailing the cuts needed if legislation funding the expanded coverage isn't approved. The Legislature last week approved Gov. Asa Hutchinson's plan to keep and rework the expansion, which uses federal funds to purchase private insurance for the poor.

Gov. Radio Column: Passage of Ark. Works

Apr 9, 2016
Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R)
Governor's Office

The following is a transcript of Gov. Asa Hutchinson's radio column for the weekend of April 8, 2016:

  This is Governor Asa Hutchinson…

There was one key bill on the agenda of the three-day extraordinary session of the General Assembly: Arkansas Works. Arkansas Works provides greater emphasis on work opportunities, requires a personal investment in healthcare, increases usage of employer-based insurance and implements cost-saving measures.

Governor Asa Hutchinson Arkansas Works Healthcare
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Gov. Asa Hutchinson has signed into law his plan to keep and rework the state's hybrid Medicaid expansion, as he now faces a fight from fellow Republicans who want to block the program's funding.

On Friday he signed into law two bills outlining his proposed changes to the program, which uses federal funds to purchase private insurance for more than 250,000 low-income residents. The program was created three years ago as an alternative to expanding Medicaid under the federal health law.

Charlie Collins
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

Arkansas legislators have given initial approval to Gov. Asa Hutchinson's plan to continue a modified form of the state's Medicaid expansion, but the margins suggest it will be an uphill battle to approve funding.

Arkansas House of Representatives.
ArkansasHouse.org

Arkansas lawmakers are taking up Gov. Asa Hutchinson's plan to keep and rework the state's hybrid Medicaid expansion.

Health Care Execs Discuss Challenges Amid Changing Laws, Demographics

Apr 6, 2016

Healthcare is changing as hospitals modify services away from fee-based compensation to an outcome-based system in compliance with the Affordable Care Act. That, and workforce shortages, were among the challenges discussed Wednesday at the Northwest Arkansas Council’s Health Care Summit in Rogers.

Changing the entire mindset of the health care sector and the patients it serves is taking place in accordance with the Affordable Health Care Act, said Dr. Bill Bradley, president and CEO of Washington Regional Medical System.

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