Arkansas History

Governor Asa Hutchinson (R) on the state Capitol steps.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Governor Asa Hutchinson briefly chimed in on the subject of Confederate iconography in the hours preceding the governor of South Carolina’s call on Monday for the removal of the Confederate battle flag from its statehouse grounds.

Hutchinson said the flag does not have a place in contemporary politics but did not say it should be removed from South Carolina’s statehouse either.

Sue Cowan Williams
UALR Center for Arkansas History and Culture

 70 years ago, a federal appeals court in St. Louis ruled that African American teachers in the Little Rock School District should receive pay equal to that of their white counterparts. The case left a lasting impact on black activism in the city.

Robinson Auditorium Center Music Hall
City of Little Rock

As workers begin to rebuild the interior of Little Rock's Robinson Auditorium, a key goal of the nearly $70 million renovation is to greatly improve its acoustics.

There had long been complaints about how live music sounded in the venue, which is the home of the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra. There were "dead spots" in the hall where the audience couldn’t properly hear the orchestra or all the instruments. That’s why the facility has been gutted and is being rebuilt inside the existing structure as part of the voter-approved project, funded with a two percent tourism tax.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Work is nearing the halfway point on a nearly $70 million project to renovate Little Rock’s historic Robinson Auditorium.

Nearly everything has now been ripped out, including the stage, balcony, interior walls and floors, leaving little more than the outside shell of the building and its support beams.

The forced relocation of Native Americans is considered by historians to be one of the darkest periods for America. In a new book released this month, NPR Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep digs into the back story of what led to the 1830 Indian Removal Act, which started the process of tribes being moved to undeveloped western parts of the country.

Lee Theater
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The Historic Preservation Alliance of Arkansas has identified several historical locations in Arkansas that it says are endangered. The alliance announced its findings Thursday in Little Rock.

On the list are:

University of California Irvine Southeast Asian Archive

Fort Chaffee in northwest Arkansas once played an important role at the end United States' official involvement in the Vietnam War after the fall of Saigon to North Vietnamese forces on April 30, 1975. From May until December of that year, Fort Chaffee became the temporary home to more than 50,000 Indochinese who had sought refugee status.

The resettlement process was known by the U.S. Military as “Operation New Life.” It was brought about when Congress enacted the Indochina Migration and Assistance Act of 1975

Port Authority Board of Directors Chairman Christopher Mathews.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

The Little Rock Port Authority decided Wednesday it will formally weigh-in on the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma’s attempt to turn 160 acres near the Arkansas River into trust land. That status would exempt it from local and state control and be the first designation of its kind in Arkansas.

Apollo 13 crew
NASA

Two Apollo 13 astronauts and its Mission Control flight director are to speak at the University of Arkansas about the flight, its problems and the eventual safe return to Earth.

Flight Capt. James Lovell, lunar module pilot Fred Haise and flight director Gene Krantz are to speak April 23 in Bud Walton Arena as part of the student Distinguished Lecture Series. The third astronaut on the flight - Jack Swigert - died in 1982.

Apollo 13 launched April 11, 1970, intended to be the third NASA mission to land men on the moon. But an oxygen tank exploded, crippling the spacecraft.

Chris Hickey / KUAR News

One hundred and fifty years ago this week Arkansas ratified the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Just after the conclusion of an afternoon seminar in Sturgis Hall of the Clinton School of Public Service on Tuesday, Dean Skip Rutherford asked folks to stick around and reflect on the Amendment.

“That Amendment abolished slavery and as a result over 400,000 slaves in Arkansas were freed,” he said.

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