Arkansas History

The Holly Jolly Trolley: A Ride Through Arkansas History

Dec 21, 2016
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

On this special holiday episode of Arts & Letters, we uncover true tales of Arkansas's past while touring the streets of Little Rock and North Little Rock inside the Rock Region Metro Streetcar—our “Holly Jolly Trolley.”

 

Along the streetcar rails we enounter a cast of characters, who tell of the cities' history bound up in the brick and mortar of the buildings—filled with ghosts and song.

 

Dr. Daniel Littlefield, the director of the Sequoyah National Research Center at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.
UALR

The months-long encampment of thousands of Native Americans at Standing Rock, to block the path of a U.S. Army acting to further the interests of extractive industries, seems both remarkable and routine in the history of American Indians.

KUAR’s Jacob Kauffman spoke with Dr. Daniel Littlefield, the Director of the Sequoyah National Research Center at UALR to put some context to the fight.

Hoga
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

The Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum is highlighting a week of events commemorating the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

North Little Rock may seem an unlikely site of naval significance but those with the Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum say it’s the only place in the U.S., other than Hawaii, where visitors can tour U.S. Navy ships present at the beginning and end of U.S. involvement in World War II. The museum claimed this distinction when it became home to the U.S. Navy Tugboat Hoga one year ago.

Encyclopedia for Arkansas History and Culture

A ceremony was held Thursday night at the dining hall of Yale University’s Calhoun College to celebrate an Arkansan who died tragically in a car accident in 1984 during his last semester at the Ivy League school.

http://arkansashumanitiescouncil.org/

This week marks the 25th anniversary of the closing of the Arkansas Gazette, once the oldest newspaper west of the Mississippi. In 1957, as nine black students integrated Little Rock’s Central High School, the paper’s editorial stance in support of integration led it to win two Pulitzer Prizes. 

A hotel in Hot Springs and a cabin at Mount Nebo State Park are the newest listings on the National Register of Historic Places. 

The Arkansas Historic Preservation Program announced Thursday that the Hill Wheatley Downtowner Motor Inn and Cabin No. 64 at Mount Nebo near Dardanelle are the latest additions to the National Register.  

The Hill Wheatley Downtowner Motor Inn was built in the early 1960s and designed in the mid-century modern style of architecture. The hotel also has a full-service bathhouse that uses thermal water pumped from Hot Springs National Park. 

Family members say former Arkansas governor and U.S. Sen. David Pryor is recovering in a hospital after suffering a stroke.

The family issued a statement Tuesday saying the 82-year-old Pryor suffered a stroke Monday and underwent surgery "that appears to have been successful."

The Democrat was Arkansas' governor from 1975 to 1979, and then served nearly 20 years in the U.S. Senate. He now serves on the board of trustees for the University of Arkansas.

baxtercountyhistory.org

The oldest public building in Arkansas will soon have a new owner.

The Baxter County Quorum Court voted this week to transfer ownership of the Jacob Wolf House in Norfork to the Department of Arkansas Heritage. The Wolf House, which was built as a courthouse in 1829, overlooks the intersection of the White and North Fork rivers.

The wooden structure was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

Command And Control
PBS

Screenings are planned around the state this coming weekend for the new documentary thriller Command & Control. It looks at the September 1980 accident at a Titan II Missile silo involving a nuclear weapon in the north Arkansas town of Damascus.

A worker doing routine maintenance on the missile dropped a socket from a wrench which fell, puncturing the rocket's fuel tank, causing it to leak. The film’s director, Robert Kenner, says the military was unprepared for the accident or how to respond, with those involved doing the best they could in the situation.

As a former civil rights attorney and now as a legal scholar and historian, Gloria Browne Marshall is no stranger to the restrictions American voters have faced in Southern states and elsewhere. Marshall is a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York and  she is the author of The Voting Rights War: The NAACP and the Struggle for Justice.

Marshall spoke Friday evening in Little Rock about the state of voting rights and voter suppression past and present. 

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