Arkansas History

Bill Clinton boyhood home
KATV, Channel 7 News

Federal authorities have joined the investigation into a fire that damaged the childhood home of former President Bill Clinton in Arkansas.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said Tuesday that it's investigating the Christmas morning fire at the home in Hope, along with the FBI, the National Park Service and the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Bill Clinton boyhood home
KATV, Channel 7 News

Authorities say a fire that caused minor damage to former President Bill Clinton's childhood home in Hope, Arkansas, was apparently caused by arson.

Hope Police Department Chief J.R. Wilson says a motorist spotted flames early Friday at the Clinton Birthplace National Historic Site. Wilson says that when firefighters arrived a short time later, flames were shooting 8 feet into the air on one side of the structure.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports that the fire was quickly extinguished and only one interior room was damaged by flames.

Arkansas-born civil rights leader Ozell Sutton passed away in Atlanta on Saturday at the age of 90.

His accomplishments in Arkansas include helping to desegregate downtown Little Rock and serving as an advisor to former Governor Winthrop Rockefeller.

Saline Old River Bridge
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A $500,000 grant will allow work to begin restoring the second-oldest bridge still standing in Arkansas, which crosses the Saline River in Benton. It's hoped it will eventually be part of an extensive cycling and pedestrian trail between Little Rock and Hot Springs.

David Monteith / KUAR

Arkansas’ three living survivors of the bombing of Pearl Harbor were honored at the Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum. The ceremony also served to welcome the newest addition to the museum, the ex-US Navy tugboat Hoga.

“The survivors from Arkansas who were in Pearl Harbor will be cutting the ribbon to allow access to the general public to the main deck of the Hoga today,” said Allison Hibblong, the museum's Director of Operations.

Milton Pitts Crenchaw
Butler Center For Arkansas Studios

A memorial service is set for Tuesday at the Arkansas state Capitol for former Tuskeegee Airman Milton Crenchaw. He died November 17th at the age of 96.

A native of Little Rock, Crenchaw was among the last surviving instructors of the group, which included the first African-Americans to fly combat missions in World War II.

The service begins at 1:30 p.m. in the first floor Rotunda and will include the unveiling of a portrait by Crenchaw’s family members.

Hoga
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

The Hoga, a World War II tugboat, became the newest addition to the Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum Monday, two weeks before the 74th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Ship horns greeted the arrival of the boat, officially classified a Navy yard tug. “That is our honorary submarine welcoming our lovely tugboat,” said Allison Hibblong, the museum’s director of operations.

Milton Pitts Crenchaw
Butler Center For Arkansas Studios

Milton Pitts Crenchaw, a flight instructor who trained many of the U.S. military's Tuskegee Airmen, has died in Georgia. He was 96.

Crenchaw's daughter, Dolores Singleton, said he died Tuesday at Piedmont Henry Hospital near Atlanta after battling cardiovascular disease and pneumonia.

Singleton said her father, a native of Little Rock, Arkansas, was among the last surviving instructors of the Tuskegee Airmen. They were the first African-Americans to fly combat airplanes in World War II.

A Confederate flag merged with the flag of the League of the South flag.
LOS

Tens of thousands of Southerners rallied this year in defense of an identity they believe is under assault: a veneration of a Confederate heritage. It’s difficult to parcel through just who comprises this movement but some say extremists within it are finding a voice.

Central High School
nps.gov

A new mobile app providing users with a tour of Little Rock’s civil rights history is launching Monday. The city of Little Rock partnered with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock’s Institute on Race and Ethnicity to develop the app. It features information on 35 stops with stories of people and places important to Arkansas’s civil rights history. 

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