Arkansas Judicial System

File photo. Attorney General Leslie Rutledge (R).
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge is asking the nation's highest court to weigh in on whether a 1994 federal law prevents Arkansas State Police from releasing all driver and survivor information on accident reports.

prison jail department of correction
Sarah Whites-Koditschek / KUAR

For the first time in over 20 years, Arkansas prisoners will have access to federal grants to go to college.

Shorter College in North Little Rock has been selected by the U.S. Department of Education as part of a three year experiment to send inmates to school.

Shorter College says it will offer a two-year associate degree in business to 250 selected inmates as part of the program.   

Sarah Whites-Koditschek / KUAR

A federal lawsuit alleges twelve percent of the city of Sherwood is being funded through predatory practices of a bad checks court system.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Arkansas partnered with the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law to file the case against the city and Pulaski County.  

Attorney Bettina Brownstein says the city imposes a ceaseless punishment of jail time and escalating fines for those who write bad checks and can’t cover the cost of an initial court fine.

Harrisburg Treatment Center
humanservices.arkansas.gov

The Arkansas Division of Youth Services is planning to stop using its Arkansas-based providers in all but one of the state's juvenile treatment centers and correctional facilities, in favor of a single company from Indiana.

At a meeting of the Children and Youth Committee on Monday, Interim Director Betty Guhman said the state will also boost its per-bed, per-day rate for juvenile offenders by 58 percent – from $147 a day to $232. State Senator Linda Chesterfield said she wants to know from where the additional funds come.

Arkansas Treasurer Dennis Milligan.
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Attorneys for a former employee of Arkansas Treasurer Dennis Milligan want a federal judge to recuse from a lawsuit against Milligan.

The motion asking Judge Brian Miller to step aside was filed Friday morning for David Singer, who is suing Milligan and Milligan's chief of staff, Jim Harris. Singer alleges an email by Harris and released after Singer's firing was defamatory because it described him as mentally unstable.

Lawyers for eight death row inmates in Arkansas say their challenge of the state's execution procedures should warrant a U.S. Supreme Court review that would likely revisit the high court's ruling on an Oklahoma case.

The Arkansas Supreme Court ruled against the inmates last month, but their lawyers want the court to withhold a final order pending a possible U.S. Supreme Court review. Part of the Arkansas ruling was based on the U.S. Supreme Court approving the use of midazolam in executions.

File photo: Governor Asa Hutchinson in the Governor's Conference Room of the state Capitol.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Gov. Asa Hutchinson is hoping Arkansas will resume executing death row inmates before January, when one of the three drugs used in the state’s lethal injection mixture will expire. 

Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Scores of young people made up the bulk of a diverse crowd about 200 on the state Capitol steps on Friday, calling for an end to police violence against African-Americans. The show of support for the Black Lives Matter movement came after the latest round of national incidents involving police officers killing seemingly cooperative young, black men. Organizers under the auspices of Hands Up, Guns Down also unequivocally condemned the killing of police officers in Dallas.

Eight death row inmates are asking the Arkansas Supreme Court to reconsider its decision to uphold a state law that keeps information about lethal injection drugs secret from the public. Attorneys for the inmates filed a petition on Thursday. Justices say the request to reconsider will be addressed before the court’s ruling goes into effect.

Governor Asa Hutchinson said he is proceeding as planned to resume executions.

Arkansas' stockpile of a paralytic drug needed for the executions of eight death row inmates will expire at midnight Thursday, leaving the state without a means to resume executions for the first time in a decade.

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