Arkansas Law Enforcement

Black Lives Matter Interstate 40 bridge over Mississippi River
KATV, Channel 7 News

Hundreds of protesters angry over police killings of black people occupied a key bridge over the Mississippi River Sunday night, blocking an interstate highway for hours before officers moved them off.

Traffic on Interstate 40 stopped in both directions after Black Lives Matter protesters marched onto the bridge. Police in squad cars tried to stop them, but several hundred had already made their way up the ramp, and the crowd swelled to more than 1,000.

Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Scores of young people made up the bulk of a diverse crowd about 200 on the state Capitol steps on Friday, calling for an end to police violence against African-Americans. The show of support for the Black Lives Matter movement came after the latest round of national incidents involving police officers killing seemingly cooperative young, black men. Organizers under the auspices of Hands Up, Guns Down also unequivocally condemned the killing of police officers in Dallas.

Governor asa hutchinson talk business & politics
Talk Business & Politics

In response to three nationally related episodes of gun violence and escalations between police officers and citizens, Gov. Asa Hutchinson said leaders must “calm the waters” in an effort to curtail overreactions to these violent and volatile situations.

“Most importantly, we need to make sure that we talk with reason and discipline as we discuss these matters. Leaders should not be encouraging and dramatizing the response beyond what it should be. The key thing here is our commitment to the rule of law,” he said.

A new Arkansas website will allow the public to search information on more than 500 missing person cases in the state.

Attorney General Leslie Rutledge, Arkansas Crime Information Center Director Jay Winters and other officials on Wednesday unveiled the new site, www.neverforgotten.ar.gov . Winters said it cost ACIC about $28,000 to set up the site.

Medical Marijuana
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Backers of one of three marijuana-related proposals vying for the November ballot in Arkansas turned in dozens of boxloads of petitions to the Secretary of State's office Monday. Now it's up to officials to determine if there are enough legitimate signatures for it to be placed before voters.

Speaking to supporters in the Capitol Rotunda, organizer Melissa Fults with Arkansans for Compassionate Care argued the benefits are clear.

David Monteith / KUAR

Summer vacation sometimes means extra work for a team of search dogs in Arkansas  that are asked to find hikers who've gone missing or people who may have drowned.

A wooded area of Burns Park in North Little Rock is one of several sites used by volunteers dedicated to training their dogs to find missing persons. Present for the training on a hot Sunday afternoon earlier this month were Donna Waugh, Mike Cope, Terri Alpe, Jason Woods and Kimberly and Hugh Wright with their dogs John D, Jude, Brandi, Lucy, and Finn.

Medical Marijuana
Arkansans for Compassionate Care

The wording for three  ballot initiatives concerning marijuana have been approved by Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge. Two would allow medicinal use of the drug while the third would legalize all forms of the cannabis plant. Now backers of the proposals are gathering signatures.

Four years ago voters narrowly defeated a similar proposal. “The Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act” was rejected by about 30,000 votes, 51-to-49 percent.

Kenton Buckner LRPD Little Rock POlice CHief
Michael Hibblen

Little Rock's Police Chief is reaching his second anniversary on the job.

With crime rates at their lowest in decades and use of force incidents dropping in the city, Kenton Buckner explains his views on policing, race, use of force, and his goals for Little Rock.

The city of Rogers and three police officers are asking a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit over the fatal shooting of a woman by police.

Fallon Frederick was shot to death Aug. 1, 2011, at a convenience store after officers responded to her 911 call for help.

The lawsuit by her brother - Darrell Frederick - says Frederick was a paranoid schizophrenic who thought she was being pursued and was cowering in the corner of the store when she was shot with a stun gun by Cpl. Nick Torkelson, then shot by Officer Vince Motsinger as she tried to run away.

The Arkansas Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Thursday in a challenge to the state’s lethal injection secrecy law.

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