Arkansas Politics

Republican Sen. John Boozman's campaign is spending nearly half a million dollars on a new television ad portraying himself as someone who puts Arkansas first as he enters the final two weeks of the campaign for his re-election. His Democratic challenger has also launched a spot touting his work prosecuting a county judge for corruption.

Medical Marijuana
Arkansans for Compassionate Care

A new Talk Business & Politics-Hendrix College survey shows that opposition remains stronger than support for two medical marijuana proposals that will be on the November ballot.

The poll, conducted statewide among 463 likely Arkansas voters on October 21, 2016, has a margin of error of 4.6%.

Election vote
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Early voting is beginning for Arkansas' general election, though the fate of a medical marijuana proposal being challenged before the state's highest court still remains unclear.

Voters can cast ballots early starting Monday for the Nov. 8 election, which includes the presidential election and U.S. Senate race between Republican Sen. John Boozman and Democratic challenger Conner Eldridge. The secretary of state's office is estimating potentially 70 percent of Arkansas' 1.7 million voters will cast a ballot in the election.

Republican U.S. Sen. John Boozman launched his first negative television ad on Friday against Democratic challenger Conner Eldridge in his Arkansas re-election bid, portraying the former federal prosecutor as a gift from President Barack Obama to a predominantly conservative state.

The 30-second spot shows a box delivered to a home in Arkansas with the White House logo and the words "Contents: Conner Eldridge" emblazoned on the side. It features a narrator mimicking the president's voice as he reads a letter attached to the box.

LITTLE ROCK — Former White House reporter turned White House historian and author Kate Anderson Brower visited the capital city today as the latest Fred K. Darragh Jr. Distinguished Lecturer of the Central Arkansas Library System.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate tonight at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

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File photo. Attorney General Leslie Rutledge (R).
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Attorney General Leslie Rutledge is launching her re-election bid, joining a growing list of Arkansas statewide elected officials preparing for the 2018 campaign.

Rutledge told The Associated Press last week that she has already begun raising money for her bid and will file her first fundraising report with state election officials on Monday. A spokesman says Rutledge plans to report she's already raised nearly $72,000 for her re-election bid.

2nd district congressional race Democrat Dianne Curry, Libertarian Chris Hayes and Republican incumbent French Hill.
AETN

The three candidates for the state’s 2nd District congressional seat faced off in the final AETN debate, discussing banking reform, the national debt and other issues.

The debate featured Republican U.S. Rep French Hill, Democrat Dianne Curry and Libertarian Chris Hayes.

Asked what banking reforms are needed to protect smaller banks from regulations while keeping the country safe from big banks’ unsafe practices, Hill, a former banker, faulted Congress for passing the Dodd-Frank Act, saying it hurt small community banks.

1st district congressional race  Rick Crawford (R) and Mark West (L)
AETN

Republican First District Congressman Rick Crawford and his Libertarian opponent, Mark West, criticized their opposing parties’ presidential nominees and disagreed about America’s role overseas during a lively debate sponsored by AETN. The debate airs at 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Asked how he would explain Donald Trump’s recent comments about women to his female constituents, Crawford said the comments disturbed him but that Trump is still a better choice than Hillary Clinton, whose policies would be a continuation of President Barack Obama’s.

The Faulkner County clerk has pleaded guilty to obstructing governmental operations and agreed to resign - but she's still running for the position next month. 

Margaret Darter pleaded guilty Tuesday to the misdemeanor charge, and she immediately resigned her position as part of her negotiated plea.  

Darter was charged in October 2015 after a prosecutor asked Arkansas State Police to conduct a criminal investigation into the date elected officials filed their Statement of Financial Interest compared to the date stamped on the documents. 

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