Arkansas Weather

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www.weather.gov / NWS

A warm front brought record high temperatures to parts of Arkansas, breaking Feb. 11 records dating to the 1920s.

The National Weather Service says Saturday's high in Little Rock reached 79 degrees to break the record of 78 degrees set in 1922.

A high of 84 in Harrison broke a record high of 76 set in 1928. Other records include 81 degrees in Fayetteville to break the record of 72 set in 1962 and 85 degrees in Fort Smith to break the record of 76 degrees, also set in 1962.

An aerial view of a wildfire near Charleston, Arkansas from November, 2017.
Arkansas Forestry Commission

Arkansas forestry officials say 2016 was a relatively quiet year for wildfires, but the fires still burned nearly 30 square miles in the state.

The Arkansas Forestry Commission says there was a total of 1,248 wildfires last year, and the busiest months were February, March and November. Officials say the top two causes of wildfires in the state were fires unintentionally started by outdoor burning and arson.

The Little Rock, North Little Rock, and Pulaski County Special School Districts are all closed Friday. The University of Arkansas at Little Rock is also closed.

Governor Asa Hutchinson has closed state offices for non-essential personnel today. Agency directors may implement liberal leave policies for their employees.

Here are some other closings and delays that have been reported for Friday due to the winter weather:

Access Schools

Arkansas Children's Hospital  — Open at 10 a.m.

Arkansas College of Barbering

snow
KUAR News

Forecasters have issued a winter weather advisory for much of western and central Arkansas as a storm system heads into the state.

The advisory goes into effect early Friday and lasts until mid-afternoon. The National Weather Service says snow will start falling in the overnight hours then persist throughout Friday morning. Forecasters say snowfall of 1 to 2 inches is possible with locally higher amounts, especially in the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains.

Forecasters say other areas could see just a dusting of snow or nothing at all.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas could be in for some wild weather next week as spring-like temperatures give way to thunderstorms and a cold front that could be packing snow and freezing rain.

The National Weather Service says high temperatures will reach into the 60s and 70s Monday before a cold front pushes in from the Plains to the state, triggering showers and thunderstorms. Forecasters say some of the storms could be severe across southeast Arkansas.

National Weather Service

A wild weather weekend is on tap for Arkansas, with forecasters warning of possible tornadoes and mild temperatures on Saturday followed by the potential for snow on Sunday.

The National Weather Service says cold temperatures are expected across Arkansas and light snow may fall in much of the state.

Up to a half-inch of snow is possible by Wednesday night in the northwestern corner of the state and up to one-tenth of an inch could fall north of a line from Fort Smith to near Newport. A light dusting is possible in all but far southern Arkansas.

National Weather Service

The coldest temperatures of the year in Arkansas are expected to arrive later this week.

Meteorologist Jeff Hood with the National Weather Service said the temperatures, which have already been unseasonably low, are expected to drop even lower. Rain is expected for much of the state, but no significant snowfall is anticipated.

National Weather Service Logo
www.weather.gov / NWS

Forecasters say unseasonably warm temperatures could lead to new record highs in Arkansas early this week.

The National Weather Service in Little Rock says hot, dry weather will persist through Wednesday with a cold front expected to move through the state on Thursday.

Monday's forecast high in Little Rock is 90 degrees - which would break a record high of 89 degrees set in 1953. The dry, summer-like conditions were so widespread that the National Weather Service had a story on its website with the headline "It Actually Rained."

Forecasters have issued an excessive heat warning for much of Arkansas as the hot summer temperatures stay put in the state.

The heat warning is in effect until 7 p.m. Thursday, and a heat advisory runs until 9 p.m. Friday. The National Weather Service says some areas could see heat index values of 110 degrees or higher.

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