Johnny Cash

Rosanne Cash Johnny Cash
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Singer-songwriter Rosanne Cash took part in a fundraiser Thursday evening at the Arkansas Governor's Mansion in Little Rock to benefit the ongoing restoration of her father Johnny Cash's boyhood home in Dyess, Arkansas.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson invited her to hold the event there, calling the Cash house, which has been turned into a museum, "a great asset for the state." Arkansas State University bought the dilapidated home in 2011, carefully restoring it to how it looked when Johnny Cash lived there with his parents and siblings.

Objecting to the Arkansas Supreme Court ruling that lower-court judges can require that defendants pay their bail only in cash, the high court's chief justice cited a musician seldom thought of as a legal scholar: Johnny Cash.

Interim Chief Justice Howard Brill on Thursday cited Cash's song "Starkville City Jail" in a dissent. He said it was wrong for the majority to deny a Benton County man's objection to a $300,000 cash-only bail set in an assault and battery case.

Rosanne Cash Johnny Cash
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Singer and songwriter Rosanne Cash is headlining a performance at the Arkansas Governor's Mansion to raise money for her father's restored boyhood home.

Arkansas State University announced Thursday it's hosting the event with Gov. Asa Hutchinson and First Lady Susan Hutchinson on March 3, with proceeds going to the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home in Dyess.

Johnny Cash Boyhood Home Attracts Thousands From Around The World

Aug 17, 2015
Johnny Cash House Dyess, Arkansas
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

It has been one year since the official opening of the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home and the Dyess Colony. Executive Director of Arkansas State University’s Heritage Sites program Dr. Ruth Hawkins says this past year has been very busy.

Johnny Cash: Arkansas Icon

Oct 8, 2014
University of Memphis Special Collections

On this episode of Arts & Letters, we take a guided tour through the Johnny Cash: Arkansas Icon Exhibit, which opens October 10th and runs through January 24th, at the Arkansas Studies Institute in downtown Little Rock.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Fans have long traveled from around the world to see the small farm house in northeast Arkansas that Johnny Cash often talked or sang about.  After years of restoration work, it is now officially open as a musuem. A grand opening ceremony was held Saturday, drawing a large crowd to the town circle in Dyess.

Johnny Cash House
Michael Hibblen / KUAR

After years of fundraising and restoration work, Johnny Cash’s boyhood home in northeast Arkansas will officially open to the public Saturday as a museum.

The country music icon – who died 11 years ago – moved to the house in 1935 when he was three years old.  His family was one of about 500 selected to live in the town of Dyess, which was created during the Great Depression as part of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. They were sold a piece of farm land at a low price in return for making contributions to the community.

Arkansas Literary Festival 2014

Apr 23, 2014
arkansasliteraryfestival.org

Upwards of 10,000 people are expected to enjoy this year’s Arkansas Literary Festival, which begins Thursday in downtown Little Rock. The event has expanded significantly since the Central Arkansas Library System took it over six years ago, said Susan Gelé.  

Gelé believes this year continues the Literary Festival’s tradition of hosting a mix of Arkansas and out-of-state authors and presenters, as well as an eclectic range of genres.

Rosanne Cash Johnny Cash
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

As final work is being completed to open Johnny Cash’s boyhood home in Dyess, Arkansas as a museum, his daughter Rosanne Cash came to Little Rock over the weekend for a sold out show and to be honored for her work in helping to restore the small house.

Winthrop Rockefeller Collection

The late Johnny Cash was well known for his prison concerts, but this weekend the BBC will air a special looking at one lesser-known prison show that helped spur reform in Arkansas.  You can listen to the show here.

The international broadcaster sent a reporter from London to Arkansas to research the performance at Cummins Prison in 1969.

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