Republican Convention

Painting a grim picture of America, Donald Trump promised to protect the country and restore "law and order" by putting "America First" in his address Thursday evening formally accepting the GOP nomination for president.

Tonight is the night Indiana Gov. Mike Pence will take the stage in Cleveland at the 2016 Republican National Convention. He is now, officially, the vice-presidential running mate of Republican nominee Donald Trump.

But before that happens, we want to take a dive into Pence's education policies in the nearly four years he's been the governor of Indiana.

Just how much does he have in common with Donald Trump when it comes to schools and education? Definitely not nothing. Let's take a look.

Asa Hutchinson Republican National Convetion
Republican National Convention

Arkansas's governor and attorney general went to bat for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump by smacking  Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton back-to-back Tuesday night in prime-time speaking slots at the Republican National Convention.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson told delegates Tuesday night that electing Clinton after President Barack Obama's eight years in office would "double your trouble."

Republicans have officially nominated Donald Trump as their presidential nominee, with his home state of New York putting him over the top.

U.S. Senator Tom Cotton (R-Yellville) at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio.
Jacob Kauffman / KUAR

Arkansas's Tom Cotton spoke during prime time at the Republican National Convention on Monday night. The state's junior U.S. Senator echoed military themes familiar to those following his career. Cotton was in the infantry in Iraq and Afghanistan prior to his legal and electoral careers.

Sen. Cotton only mentioned Trump's name once and never said his full name. Cotton said, "In a Trump-Pence administration and with a Republican Congress, help is on the way.” 

Watch Cotton's speech here:

U.S. Representative Steve Womack (R-Third Distirct)
NPR

Arkansas Congressman Steve Womack was at the center of holding back the last gasp of the Never Trump movement at the Republican National Convention.

The U.S. Representative for the third district in northwest Arkansas served as chair on Monday afternoon, when rules for the convention were adopted. On a voice vote, Womack determined delegates approved the normal set of rules binding delegates to vote according to primary and caucus results and consequently paving the way to Donald Trump’s nomination.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A chaotic first day at the Republican National Convention gave way to an emotional evening centered on national security and capped off by a rousing speech by Donald Trump's wife, Melania.

Donald Trump speaking at Barton Coliseum in Little Rock, Arkansas.
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

Three Arkansas Republicans will garner much of the limelight for the state at the Republican National Convention with speaking slots, but 40 delegates are also in tow. We’ll be checking in with a handful of Arkansas delegates on the ground in Cleveland throughout this week. 

KUAR will air live coverage of the convention this Monday through Thursday from 7-10 p.m. Tune in to Morning Edition from 6-9 a.m. for recaps and analysis of the night before and previews of the day to come.

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee at the state Capitol in November 2015.
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee was to speak at the Republican National Convention this week, but no more.

Huckabee has sought the Republican presidential nomination twice, most recently placing 9th in Iowa before dropping out . He was to speak in Cleveland along with fellow Arkansans Tom Cotton, Asa Hutchinson, and Leslie Rutledge.

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