Week-In-Review Podcast

On this week's podcast, we discuss Governor Asa Hutchinson's Summit calling on the faithful to help address a lack of foster care beds and the difficulties parolees face in the state. We look at the strategy of state regulators tasked with implementing the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan. We talk about the visit to Little Rock of Dr. Ben Carson, the fourth Republican Presidential candidate to come through Arkansas. And there's a new state Supreme Court Justice in town, who is he?

The top story this week: Gov. Asa Hutchinson lays out a seven-point plan to continue the state's participation in the Medicaid expansion through the private option, though officials also resume sending cancellation notices to those who didn't respond to verification request.

On this week's podcast, KUAR news staffers discuss cancelations to Arkansans covered by Medicaid or the private option, a potential defense for justices of the peace who don't want to conduct same-sex weddings, how former Governor Mike Huckabee fared in the Republican presidential debate and reaction to final rules for the Clean Power Plan.

This is our longest podcast yet, but we had a lot of important and interesting items to discuss this week. We really want to hear from you if you slogged it out to the finish line.

This week the KUAR news staff discusses a couple of new state laws. One bans cities and counties from enforcing ordinances like anti-discrimination measures on sexual orientation or gender identity. Another makes "rehoming" a felony. Task forces looking into Common Core standards and computer science in public schools are making progress. And a look at monuments to the Confederacy in Arkansas.

On KUAR's Week-In-Review Podcast, the news staff discusses ongoing talks between Gov. Asa Hutchinson and legislative leaders over the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage ruling, an appeals court refusing to reconsider its ruling on a 12 week abortion ban, the state Board of Educations' approval of a change for standardized testing, Rep. Bruce Westerman getting passage of a bill on managing forests and work being completed on a $150 million project to rebuild Little Rock's Big Rock Interchange.

You can subscribe to the podcast via iTunes to hear each week's episode.

KUAR's news staff reviews the week a little early, in advance of the extended 4th of July holiday weekend.

Lethal injection gets a second life in Arkansas, a pair of Purple Hearts for victims of an act of terrorism on Arkansas soil, counties start to tally the number of marriage licenses issued to same-sex couples, Little Rock's long-time performance hall makes it to a renovation checkpoint on time, a hiccup in the governor's plans for Common Core, and Confederate flags get unfurled for the 4th of July.

Two major rulings this week by the U.S. Supreme Court dominate the discussion on KUAR's Week-In-Review podcast this week. 

On Thursday, the court let stand a major provision of the Affordable Care Act, saying federal subsidies can go to states like Arkansas which did not set up state-run exchanges, but instead partner with a federal exchange. The news staff discusses the ruling and has reaction from state legislatures.

Leading the program this week, the news staff talks about anticipation of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act and implications for Arkansas. 

Several stories about the state's prisons also made news this week. A report said the prison population is growing faster than any other state in the nation, an opinion from the Arkansas Supreme Court means many inmates sentenced to life for crimes committed as juveniles may need to be re-sentenced and efforts to address mental health and sexual assault behind bars.

Join the KUAR news staff for a discussion on the top stories of the week.  

On this podcast:  a fight over the first recommendation regarding Common Core educational standards, a judge ruling that Arkansas should recognize same-sex marriages conducted last year, a request for a federal disaster declaration being prepared after flooding along the Arkansas and Red rivers, a request for a formal opinion on the open carry of firearms and a federal appeals court tossing out a challenge of EPA mission standards.

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