Two-year-old Adalynn Landrum lies on a blanket on the floor of her living room. She watches cartoons on a large flat screen television screen hung above a row of stuffed animals placed on a blanket next to her on the floor. Her small face is partially covered by an oxygen feeding cup with a tube connected to a medical cart stationed behind her head. The cart holds an array of devices.

Arkansas voters oppose a Republican effort to repeal Obamacare immediately and wait two years to find a replacement plan.

The latest Talk Business & Politics-Hendrix College survey of more than 500 Arkansas voters tested this effort and asked an additional question about Medicaid expansion and the Arkansas Works program.

Q: Senate Republicans have discussed a plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act now and replace it two years from now with a yet-to-be-determined plan. Do you support or oppose this?

30% Support
52% Oppose
18% Don’t Know

Donald Trump speaking at Barton Coliseum in Little Rock, Arkansas.
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

In the now-reliably red state of Arkansas, President Donald Trump’s job approval rating is taking a hit.

According to the latest Talk Business & Politics-Hendrix College survey, the nation’s chief executive has gone from a 60%-35% job approval-disapproval rating in February to just 50-47% in July. In April, Trump had a 53%-39% approval rating.

Q: Do you approve or disapprove of the job President Donald Trump is doing?

39%  Strongly Approve
11%   Somewhat Approve
7%    Somewhat Disapprove
40%  Strongly Disapprove
3%.   No Opinion

Arkansas’s U.S. Senators Boozman and Cotton say they both support repealing without immediately replacing the Affordable Care Act. That comes as support for GOP-crafted healthcare legislation tears apart at the seams. Meanwhile, Gov. Asa Hutchinson suggests it may be time for a bipartisan approach.

An Arkansas mother whose 5-year-old son died after being left in a day care van for almost nine hours in hot weather is suing the facility.

In the civil lawsuit filed Thursday, Ashley Smith says Ascent Children's Health Services failed to provide adequate care for her son. The suit says the day care was "indifferent in the recruitment, hiring, training, supervision, discipline of employees," and showed a "callous disregard."

Smith says she wants the day care closed.

A former Arkansas Senate president who admitted spending more than $150,000 of campaign funds on personal items has been released from federal prison.

The Jonesboro Sun reports that former Sen. Paul Bookout was released from federal prison earlier this month and will complete the remainder of his sentence at his home in Jonesboro.

Bookout pleaded guilty to one count of federal mail fraud and was sentenced to 18 months in prison. He began serving his sentence in May 2016 at a minimum-security prison in Illinois.

The Arkansas Department of Workforce Services says the state’s unemployment rate remained stable in June, at 3.4 percent. That rate remains lower than the national unemployment rate, which ticked upward by a tenth of a percent to 4.4 percent for the month.

The DWS says the civilian labor force grew by about 9,000 in June to 1.36 million people—which also represents an increase of about 20,000 over the same period last year.

City of Little Rock

Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola on Thursday outlined a plan to reduce violence in the city. The “Little Rock for Life” plan (available here) addresses ways to improve the police department, invest in violence prevention programs, expand job opportunities, and revitalize neighborhoods, among other areas.

CLARKSVILLE — Before a gathering of Rotarians enjoying corn on the cob and barbecue pork, inside a cool room at the University of the Ozarks, the state’s former lieutenant governor and the city’s utilities manager explain the prescience of a 20,000-module solar array in 20 slides.

 

It's a roughly $10 million investment, or about what the city itself spends in just eight months for power, since it doesn’t generate any itself, according to the manager, John Lester.

Voter ID Vote photo ID
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A legislative panel has cleared the way for Arkansas to begin enforcing its reinstated voter ID law later this year.

The executive subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council on Thursday approved the state Board of Election Commissioners emergency rule enforcing the new law requiring voters to show photo identification before casting a ballot. Those without photo identification can sign a sworn statement saying they're registered to vote in the state.

Pages

Stay Connected

Weekly News Roundup

The KUAR stories you want, delivered to your inbox. Subscribe below or text MYNEWS to 22828 to sign up.

KUAR Shop

Every purchase supports programming!

E-News Sign Up

Receive e-newsletters about public radio stuff.

Vehicle Donation

When you donate a vehicle to benefit public radio, you are turning your car into financial support for the community programming you trust and rely on.

Another Way To Support Public Radio

Alternative Giving

A donation to your non-profit public radio stations in honor or memory of a loved one can be made easily online. You can add a personalized message and print the honor card immediately.

Classical Music: Our Sister Station

KLRE Classical 90.5

Classical music 24-7. Tune in or listen online.

Podcast

Week In Review Podcast

Every Friday, journalists from the KUAR news team review the week's news. Listen here on our website or in the NPR One app.