News About Public Radio

Faces Of NPR: Sharahn Thomas

Mar 6, 2017

Faces Of NPR is a weekly feature that showcases the people behind NPR, from the voices you hear every day on the radio to the ones who work outside of the recording studio. You'll find out about what they do and what they're inspired by on the daily. This week's post features Director of News Operations, Sharahn Thomas.

The Basics:

Name: Sharahn Thomas

Twitter Handle:@SharahnThomas

Job Title: Director of News Operations

Faces Of NPR: Wes Lindamood

Feb 27, 2017

Faces Of NPR is a weekly feature that showcases the people behind NPR, from the voices you hear every day on the radio to the ones who work outside of the recording studio. You'll find out about what they do and what they're inspired by on the daily. This week's post features Senior Interaction Designer, Wes Lindamood.

The Basics:

Name: Wes Lindamood

Twitter Handle: @lindamood

Job Title: Senior Interaction Designer, NPR Visuals

Your Guide To NPR At SXSW 2017

Feb 24, 2017

Public radio fans, lend us your ears. NPR staff and journalists are once again journeying to Austin, Texas, for the South By Southwest 2017 Conference and Festival. Here's your one-stop guide to connecting with us at panels, meet-ups and our annual NPR Music showcase.

NPR Music

SXSW Showcase 2017 With Support From Blue Headphones

Faces Of NPR: Adam Cole

Feb 22, 2017

Faces Of NPR is a weekly feature that showcases the people behind NPR, from the voices you hear every day on the radio to the ones who work outside of the recording studio. You'll find out about what they do and what they're inspired by on the daily. This week's post features Science Desk Reporter and Skunk Bear host, Adam Cole.

The Basics:

Name: Adam Cole

Faces Of NPR: Leah Donnella

Feb 13, 2017

Faces Of NPR is a weekly feature that showcases the people behind NPR, from the voices you hear every day on the radio to the ones who work outside of the recording studio. You'll find out about what they do and what they're inspired by on the daily. This week's post features Code Switch News Assistant, Leah Donnella.

The Basics:

Name: Leah Donnella

Faces Of NPR: Ashley Messenger

Feb 7, 2017

Faces Of NPR is a weekly feature that showcases the people behind NPR, from the voices you hear every day on the radio to the ones who work outside of the recording studio. You'll find out about what they do and what they're inspired by on the daily. This week's post features Senior Associate General Counsel, Ashley Messenger.

The Basics:

Name: Ashley Messenger

Twitter Handle: @ashmessesq

Job Title: Senior Associate General Counsel

John Cain
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

John Cain, who has been a familiar radio voice for half a century in central Arkansas, marked his 80th birthday Wednesday. He is also known for his efforts to preserve African-American culture. Many longtime friends and colleagues came together at Little Rock's Whitewater Tavern Wednesday night to celebrate with live music and cake.

Cain, who is program director of community radio station KABF-FM 88.3, has also hosted KUAR's 52nd Street Jazz for more than three decades. He has been on the air in some capacity for "51 years and counting."

In 2012 we launched the NPR Music app, a standalone music experience designed to showcase the best music content from NPR and NPR stations. Today we're announcing that we are ending support for the app on both iPhone and iPad.

Faces Of NPR is a weekly feature that showcases the people behind NPR, from the voices you hear every day on the radio to the ones who work outside of the recording studio. You'll find out about what they do and what they're inspired by on the daily. This week's post is our first triple feature—meet Ramtin Arablouei, Casey Herman and Rund Abdelfatah. They are producers for NPR's podcasts How I Built This and TED Radio Hour.

The Basics:

Name: Ramtin Arablouei

The message below was sent by NPR's Senior Vice President of News and Editorial Director Michael Oreskes to the NPR News staff on Jan. 17.

The right of working journalists to do their jobs should not be up for debate when a new administration takes office (or at any other time). But it disturbingly seems to be.

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