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Before Carmencita Misa became bedridden, she was a veritable "dancing queen," says her daughter, Charlotte Altieri.

"Even though she would work about 60 hours a week, she would make sure to go out dancing once a week — no matter what," Altieri, says. "She was the life-of-the-party kind of person, the central nervous system for all her friends."

A massive stroke in March 2014 changed all that. It robbed Misa, 71, of her short-term memory, her eyesight and her mobility — and it left her dependent on a feeding tube for nourishment. Now, she lives in a nursing home.

An airstrike by U.S.-led coalition forces leveled a school west of Raqqa and killed at least 33 people, according to two activist groups monitoring Syria. The groups allege the attack, which they say occurred overnight on Monday and Tuesday, hit a building that had been housing families fleeing violence in war-torn areas nearby.

Updated at 7:12 p.m. ET

Explosive accusations and countercharges on Wednesday threatened to derail one of Congress' investigations into the potential connections between President Trump's 2016 campaign aides and Russia's meddling in the election.

The Republican chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Devin Nunes of California, announced that he had learned that then-President-elect Donald Trump and some of his staff had been caught up in U.S. surveillance of foreign targets overseas in the months after the election.

High school juniors and seniors are well into their college preparation — taking the SAT, visiting schools and filling out applications. But it’s not too early for sophomores to start planning.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets some tips on what 10th-graders — and their parents — should be thinking about from Lisa Micele (@LisaMicele), director of college counseling at the University of Illinois Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois.

S&P And Dow See Worst Drops In 5 Months

4 hours ago

The S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average both fell by around 1 percent Tuesday, for the first time in five months. Many investors saw the drops as a sign of doubts about whether President Trump will be able to accomplish tax cuts or infrastructure spending.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) about what we can take from market moves this week.

Actor Woody Harrelson has played a number of dramatic parts in the past few years in “The Hunger Games” films, the HBO series “True Detective” and his Oscar-nominated turn in “The Messenger.”

But as the title character in the new film “Wilson” (@WilsonMovie), Harrelson plays a man with no filter, who has no qualms about telling total strangers his life story. As he tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young, the role is a welcome return to comedy.

Thursday will mark seven years since President Obama signed the now-threatened Affordable Care Act before a crowd in the jam-packed East Room of the White House. It was the signature legislative moment of his presidency, underscored by then-Vice President Biden, who whispered into the president's ear that it was a "big f****** deal." The mic picked up the remark, which created quite a stir.

The owner of a Massachusetts compounding pharmacy was acquitted on 25 counts of second-degree murder, but guilty of racketeering and fraud in the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak that killed 64 people and hurt more than 700.

A jury found Barry Cadden, an owner of the now-defunct New England Compounding Center, guilty of some of the charges, but decided against holding him directly responsible for the deaths, which could have resulted in a life sentence for Cadden.

A few days ago, one of my students asked me what I was reading, so I told her about Jean Hanff Korelitz's new novel, called The Devil and Webster. My student's eyes got wider as I finished lightly summarizing the plot, and she said, with some concern about Korelitz: "I hope she's ready for all the angry tweets and emails."

Yeah, I think she probably is.

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