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3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A Wild West In Flight: Drones Outpace The Rules Reining Them In

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:49 am

Drone technology has moved at a quicker pace than the rules regulating their use, creating an environment that journalist Craig Whitlock likens to the Wild West. He talks with Audie Cornish about what he learned in the course of reporting his series "Hazard Above," which addresses the safety record of drones for The Washington Post.

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Education
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A 'Major Shift' In Oversight Of Special Education

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan says states must ensure progress for students with disabilities.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

The Obama administration said Tuesday that the vast majority of the 6.5 million students with disabilities in U.S. schools today are not receiving a quality education, and that it will hold states accountable for demonstrating that those students are making progress.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced what he calls "a major shift" in how the government evaluates the effectiveness of federally funded special education programs.

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Iraq
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

U.S. Faces Challenges In Shoring Up Iraq's Crumbling Military

The Iraqi army left behind equipment, including body armor and vehicles, as Sunni militants overran the northern city of Mosul earlier this month.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:19 pm

Rick Brennan remembers sitting around Baghdad back in 2011 with some fellow U.S. military planners. Talk turned to the Iraqi army of the future. In one scenario, they pictured the Iraqi army falling apart, splintering along ethnic lines.

"We painted a worst-case scenario, a nightmare scenario, that was exactly what we're seeing take place right now," Brennan says.

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Iraq
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

At Iraq's Largest Oil Refinery, Siege Nears A Complicated Conclusion

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Code Switch
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

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NPR Story
2:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

An Evening With John Waters On Hitchhiking And Middle America

Film director John Waters has penned a book called "Carsick," about his cross-country hitchhiking trip. (Jason Kempin/Getty Images for EJAF)

John Waters has never been afraid of taking risks. His films have depicted everything from convicted criminals to coprophagia, and he’s often been in the news for his controversial opinions.

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NPR Story
2:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Where Are We On The Housing Market?

A "sale pending" sign is pictured on a house. (Dan Moyle/Flickr)

The Commerce Department is reporting that new home sales soared in May to their highest level since the financial market crisis six years ago. That follows a report yesterday that sales of existing homes also rose sharply last month.

But even with the gains, sales of both new and existing homes are running well below what economists consider healthy. So where are we on the housing market?

Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the housing market.

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NPR Story
2:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Wimbledon Watch: New Faces As Women's Tennis Makes A Comeback

Sloane Stephens of the United States in action during her Ladies' Singles first round match against Maria Kirilenko of Russia on day one of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club at Wimbledon on June 23, 2014 in London, England. (Steve Bardens/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 3:42 pm

Sports correspondent Tom Perrotta, writes that “women’s tennis has finally found its future.” And it’s beyond the hands of Maria Sharapova, or Serena and Venus Williams.

American Sloane Stevens, 21, lost on day one of Wimbledon yesterday, but 18-year-old Taylor Townsend plays today. They’re both up-and-coming players to watch, along with 20-year-old Canadian Eugenie Bouchard, who also plays today.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Draft Of Bob Dylan's 'Like A Rolling Stone' Sells For $2 Million

A photo provided by Sotheby's shows a page from a working draft of Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone." The draft sold for more than $2 million.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:42 pm

This post was updated at 5:50 p.m. ET.

Lyrics scribbled on hotel stationery circa 1965 that later became one of the most iconic rock songs of all time, Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," has fetched more than $2 million in an auction at Sotheby's.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Federal Judge Rules No-Fly List Process Is Unconstitutional

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 4:21 pm

A federal judge in Oregon says the process surrounding the federal government's "no-fly list" is unconstitutional.

Specifically, U.S. District Judge Anna Brown said the process doesn't give Americans on the list an effective way to challenge their inclusion.

The Oregonian reports:

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