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The Two-Way
2:12 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A Giant Among Dinosaurs, Discovered In Argentina

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:28 am

Paleontologists in Argentina say they have unearthed the fossils of the biggest dinosaur ever to walk the planet.

The bones are believed to be from a new species of the aptly named titanosaur, a massive herbivore from the late Cretaceous period, officials from the Museo Paleontologico Egidio Feruglio told BBC News.

The titanosaur was a sauropod, like the apatosaurus or brachiosaurus, that roamed the forests of Patagonia 95 million years ago.

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The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

'The Play Of The Game': Watch A Boy Win Over A Girl With A Foul Ball

A boy hands a girl a foul ball and she smiles broadly.
MLB

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:31 am

The game announcers called it "the play of the game." We'd be foolish not to agree.

During last night's Blue Jays-Rangers game, a boy catches a foul ball. Without a thought, he turns around and gives the ball to a much older girl, who flashes a major smile.

You're thinking, wow, what a smooth operator. But the replay reveals the kid is slicker than you imagined. Just watch:

h/t: Deadspin.

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Religion
12:22 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Nigerian Church Spreads African-Style Zeal Across North America

Members of the Redeemed Christian Church of God pray at Redemption Camp in Floyd, Texas, in 2009. The church is on a mission to spread to every city in North America.
Jessica Rinaldi Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 12:50 pm

In earlier times, white missionaries traveled from Europe and America to sub-Saharan Africa to save souls.

Today, the trend has reversed. Evangelists from the global south are targeting Americans and Europeans they say are ripe for Christian renewal.

There is no greater example than the Redeemed Christian Church of God. This ambitious Nigerian denomination has established its North American headquarters in Texas, and its goal is nothing less than becoming the next major global religion.

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Middle East
11:55 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Unity Is A Difficult Mission For Christians In Israel

Arab-Israeli children ride in a float during an annual march for Virgin Mary in the northern Israeli city of Haifa on May 11. Arab Christians don't mix much with migrant or Russian Christians.
Ahmad Gharibli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:58 pm

Pope Francis visits the Mideast next week, including Israel, where Christians make up just 2 percent of the population.

But since the last papal visit to the Holy Land five years ago, the number of Christians in Israel has increased, and the makeup of the Christian population has continued to shift.

The vast majority of Israeli Christians have always been Arab and they still make up three-quarters of the 160,000 Christians living in Israel. But tens of thousands of Christians have come to Israel from Asia and Africa — both legal workers and undocumented migrants.

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Code Switch
11:24 am
Sun May 18, 2014

The American Story, As It Was Reported To The Rest Of The Nation

A display of America's first ethnic newspapers at the Newseum's new exhibit, "One Nation With News For All." The exhibit opened on May 16 and runs through Jan. 5, 2015.
Jonathan Thompson/Newseum

The first draft of American history has many authors.

And they include journalists from ethnic media: newspapers, websites, radio and TV stations dedicated to reporting news for immigrant and ethnic communities.

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Swiss Voters Reject Hiking Minimum Wage To World's Highest Level

A man casts his ballot on Sunday in Bulle, western Switzerland, during a referendum.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 2:05 pm

Swiss voters resoundingly rejected a measure that would have hiked the country's minimum wage to the highest level in the world.

If approved, the referendum would have raised the national minimum wage to $25 an hour. Bloomberg reports that 76.3 percent of voters no on the measure.

The AP reports:

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Interviews
9:30 am
Sun May 18, 2014

A First Black Professor Remembers Her Segregated Education

Hortense McClinton graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in the 1930s and became the first black professor at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
Courtesy of Howard University

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 3:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Hortense McClinton has lived with a remarkable sense of determination — for 95 years.

Her father's parents were slaves, and McClinton grew up in a completely segregated society, the all-black town of Boley, Okla.

"I didn't realize how segregated everything was," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. That changed after a visit with her uncle in Guthrie, Okla.

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The Two-Way
9:28 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Reports: Syrian Air Defense Chief Killed In Rebel Attack

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 2:04 pm

The chief of Syria's air defense has been killed during an attack by rebel fighters on Sunday, news outlets, including The Associated Press and The Guardian, are reporting.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Turkey Arrests More Than A Dozen In Connection With Mine Disaster

Riot police detain a protester as they use water cannons and teargas to disperse people who were protesting the Soma mine accident that killed 301 miners, in Istanbul, Turkey, on Saturday.
AP

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 1:43 pm

Turkish authorities arrested more than a dozen people in connection with the country's worst mining disaster.

According to the Times of India, the arrests include mining company executives.

The BBC reports that after the rescue operation concluded on Saturday, the death toll stood at 301.

The BBC adds:

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Sun May 18, 2014

China To Send More Ships To Evacuate Its Citizens From Vietnam

Policemen ask people to leave a street near to the Chinese embassy in Hanoi on Sunday. A call for further anti-China protests appeared to have fizzled in the capital, with authorities deploying heavy security around the Chinese embassy and other suspected protest sites.
Hoang Dinh Nam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 1:42 pm

China says it plans to send five more ships in an effort to evacuate its citizens from Vietnam, where anti-Chinese protests have turned violent.

Reporting from Shanghai, NPR's Frank Langfitt tells our Newscast unit that Vietnamese authorities broke up another protest planned for today. He filed this report:

"At least one passenger ship has already sailed from Ch's far southern province of Hainan to Vietnam, according to the New China News Service.

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