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UCA Houston Davis
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas' governor says a $500,000 grant is being provided to help pay for a new cybersecurity training initiative.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced Wednesday the grant from the Department of Higher Education would go to the University of Central Arkansas to pay for a "cyber range," a dedicated computer system that can simulate a computer network. Students using the cyber range will learn how to identify cyberattacks and defend against them.

Hutchinson said UCA will have state of the art technology available through the Arkansas Educational Television Network.

Arkansas finance officials say a decline in motor vehicle sales and business spending pushed the state's sales tax collections below forecast last month.

The Department of Finance and Administration said Tuesday the state's net available revenue in September totaled $518.8 million, which was $3.3 million above the same month last year and $7.1 million below forecast. The state's net available revenue for the fiscal year that began July 1 totals more than $1.3 billion, which is $2.2 million above forecast.

Jack Greene
Arkansas Department of Correction

Lawyers for an Arkansas man scheduled to be executed next month say his life should be spared because he suffered sexual abuse as a child and comes from a family with a long history of mental illness.

The Arkansas Parole Board will hold a hearing Wednesday for Jack Greene, who is scheduled to die Nov. 9 for the 1991 killing of Sidney Jethro Burnett after Burnett and his wife accused Greene of arson.

In papers filed Monday, Greene's lawyers say he is mentally ill and that his execution would violate the U.S. Constitution and "bring shame on the state of Arkansas."

Wendell Griffen
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

An Arkansas judge is again asking a disciplinary panel to dismiss a complaint concerning his participation in an anti-death penalty demonstration the same day he blocked the state from using an execution drug.

An attorney for Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen on Friday renewed a request that the Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission drop the complaint. Griffen was photographed in April lying down on a cot outside the governor's mansion after he blocked Arkansas from using a lethal injection drug over claims that the state misled a medical supply company.

Governor Asa Hutchinson
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas’ governor called for additional safeguards at the state’s prisons on Friday after a string of violence that included three guards being assaulted by inmates and hospitalized a day earlier in separate attacks at two facilities.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson said he was greatly concerned by the incidents Thursday afternoon in which two guards were assaulted by several inmates at the Varner Unit hours after a guard was assaulted by a prisoner in another incident at the Maximum Security Unit in Tucker.

Jack Greene
Arkansas Department of Correction

Attorneys for an Arkansas inmate scheduled to be put to death in November have asked a judge to spare his life.

They say the execution would violate the Constitution because the inmate suffers from a psychotic disorder.

Attorneys for Jack Gordon Greene asked a Jefferson County judge late Wednesday to give Greene a hearing to determine whether he is incompetent to be executed.

Greene was convicted of killing Sidney Jethro Burnett in 1991 after Burnett and his wife accused Greene of arson.

Arkansas Death Chamber Lethal Injection
Arkansas Department of Correction

Arkansas' highest court has halted a judge's order requiring the state to release the labels and package inserts for an execution drug it plans to use in putting an inmate to death in November.

The state Supreme Court on Wednesday granted an emergency stay of a Pulaski County judge's ruling requiring officials to release the materials related to its supply of midazolam, one of three drugs used in Arkansas' lethal injection process. An attorney sued the state after officials wouldn't release the labels and package inserts.

Planned Parenthood
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

A federal appeals court says it won't reconsider a panel's decision to clear the way for the state to restrict how the abortion pill is administered.

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday denied a request from Planned Parenthood to have the full court review a three-judge panel's ruling vacating a judge's preliminary injunction against the 2015 law.

The measure requires doctors providing the pill to maintain a contract with another physician who has admitting privileges at a hospital and who agrees to handle any complications.

Arkansas' highest court says Pulaski County judges can hold resentencing hearings for seven inmates sentenced to life terms as juveniles, potentially setting a course for how courts statewide should handle cases from similar inmates in other counties.

The U.S. Supreme Court has said juvenile offenders cannot be sentenced to life terms without at least a chance at parole. Arkansas legislators subsequently declared such inmates parole-eligible after a term of years, but Pulaski County judges want each inmate to receive an individualized resentencing hearing.

Arkansas Death Chamber Lethal Injection
Arkansas Department of Correction

An Arkansas judge says prison officials must release the package label from a recently acquired lethal injection drug, saying manufacturers don't enjoy the same secrecy as others under the state's execution procedures.

Lawyer Steven Shults says Arkansas' Freedom of Information law requires disclosure. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Mackie Pierce on Tuesday rejected the state's argument that privacy granted to drug sellers and suppliers in Arkansas' execution law also extends to manufacturers.

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